Divine Liturgy – 01/23/2022

Click here – to Light a Candle

Divine Liturgy – 01/16/2022

Click here – to Light a Candle

The Liturgical Guide and Bulletin for Sunday, January 16th, 2022

 


January 16, 2022
12th Sunday of Luke

 

Saints and Feasts Commemorated 

Veneration of Apostle Peter’s Precious Chains
January 16

Herod Agrippa, the grandson of Herod the Great and king of the Jews, grew wroth against the Church of Christ, and slew James, the brother of John the Evangelist. Seeing that this pleased the Jews, he took Peter also into custody and locked him up in prison, intending to keep him there until after the feast of the Passover, so that he could win the favour of the people by presenting him to them as a victim. But the Apostle was saved when he was miraculously set free by an Angel (Acts 12:1-19). The chains wherewith the Apostle was bound received from his most sacred body the grace of sanctification and healing, which is bestowed upon the faithful who draw nigh with faith.
That such sacred treasures work wonders and many healings is witnessed by the divine Scripture, where it speaks concerning Paul, saying that the Christians in Ephesus had such reverence for him, that his handkerchiefs and aprons, taken up with much reverence, healed the sick of their maladies: “So that from his body were brought unto the sick handkerchiefs or aprons, and the diseases departed from them, and the evil spirits went out of them” (Acts 19:12). But not only the Apostles’ clothing (which certainly touched the bodies of the sick), but even their shadow alone performed healings. On beholding this, people put their sick on stretchers and beds and brought them out into the streets that, when Peter passed by, his shadow “might overshadow some of them”(Acts 5:15). From this the Church has learned to show reverence and piety not only to the relics of their bodies, but also in the clothing of God’s Saints.

 

St. Makarios Kalogeras, hierodeacon of Patmos
January 17

 

He was born to a prosperous family on the island of Patmos. As soon as he was old enough to leave home, he attended the Patriarchal School in Constantinople, where he distinguished himself. He became a monk, then a deacon, but always refused to be ordained to the priesthood, though the Metropolitan of Nikomedia wished Makarios to be his successor. Instead, he returned to Patmos in 1713 and entered the Monastery of St John the Theologian, where he remained until his death.
Though he lived in great asceticism and constant prayer, Saint Makarios was moved by a concern for the salvation and education of the Orthodox people, who often lived in great ignorance, even of their own faith, under Ottoman rule. He established a school in a building adjacent to the monastery, and offered courses free of charge to any who could come. Modeling the curriculum on that of the Patriarchal School, he served more as a spiritual father than a worldly professor. The school grew steadily, partly due to generous contributions from a few wealthy Greek families and trade guilds in Constantinople. But students, many of them very poor, still had to pay for their own needs, and Saint Makarios used his own funds to aid the poorest of them. In addition, he secretly distributed any money that came to him personally to the poor on Patmos. The school at Patmos became famous throughout the Church, and its head became a spiritual father not only to his students but througout the Greek nation. Bishops often asked him to write homilies; about sixty of these were published in book form as The Trumpet of the Gospel, which is still widely read today by the faithful. Having greatly edified thousands while laboring tirelessly for the salvation of his soul, Saint Makarios reposed in peace in 1737.

 


 

Liturgical Guide

 

Resurrectional Apolytikion in the Plagal First Mode
Τὸν συνάναρχον Λόγον Πατρὶ καὶ Πνεύματι…
Let us worship the Word, O ye faithful, praising Him that with the Father and the Spirit is co-beginningless God, Who was born of a pure Virgin that we all be saved; for He was pleased to mount the Cross in the flesh that He assumed, accepting thus to endure death.  And by His glorious rising, He also willed to resurrect the dead.
Reading is under copyright and is used with permission, all rights reserved by: Holy Transfiguration Monastery

 

Apolytikion for Veneration of the Chains of Apostle Peter in the Second Mode
Τὴν Ῥώμην μὴ λιπῶν…
Without leaving Rome, thou didst come to us by the precious chains which thou didst wear. O foremost of the Apostles.  And venerating them with faith, we pray:  By thine intercessions with God, grant us great mercy.
Reading is under copyright and is used with permission, all rights reserved by: Holy Transfiguration Monastery

 

Apolytikion of St. Demetrios in the Third Mode
Μέγαν εύρατο εv τοίς κιvδύvοις…
Greatness has been found in danger.  You are champion of the world.  A victor who could turn the nations back.  You boldly encouraged Nestor to defeat Lyaeus in the arena.  Therefore, holy great martyr Demetrios, intercede with Christ our God, to grant us His great mercy.
Reading is under copyright and is used with permission, all rights reserved by: Holy Transfiguration Monastery

 

Seasonal Kontakion in the First Mode
Ὁ μήτραν παρθενικὴν ἁγιάσας τῶ τόκω σου…
Your birth sanctified a Virgin’s womb and properly blessed the hands of Symeon.  Having now come and saved us O Christ our God, give peace to Your commonwealth in troubled times and strengthen those in authority, whom You love, as only the loving One.
Reading is under copyright and is used with permission, all rights reserved by: Narthex Press

 

Epistle Reading

Prokeimenon. Plagal First Mode. Psalm 11.7,1.
You, O Lord, shall keep us and preserve us.
Verse: Save me, O Lord, for the godly man has failed.

 

The reading is from St. Paul’s Letter to the Colossians 3:4-11

Brethren, when Christ who is our life appears, then you also will appear with him in glory. Put to death therefore what is earthly in you: fornication, impurity, passion, evil desire, and covetousness, which is idolatry. On account of these the wrath of God is coming upon the sons of disobedience. In these you once walked, when you lived in them. But now put them all away: anger, wrath, malice, slander, and foul talk from your mouth. Do not lie to one another, seeing that you have put off the old nature with its practices and have put on the new nature, which is being renewed in knowledge after the image of its creator. Here there cannot be Greek and Jew, circumcised and uncircumcised, barbarian, Scythian, slave, free man, but Christ is all, and in all.

Gospel Reading

 

The reading is from Luke 17:12-19

At that time, as Jesus entered a village, he was met by ten lepers, who stood at a distance and lifted up their voices and said:  “Jesus, Master, have mercy on us.”  When he saw them he said to them, “Go and show yourselves to the priests.” And as they went they were cleansed.  Then one of them, when he saw that he was healed, turned back, praising God with a loud voice; and he fell on his face at Jesus’s feet, giving him thanks.  Now he was a Samaritan.  Then said Jesus: “Were not ten cleansed? Where are the nine?  Was no one found to return and give praise to God except this foreigner?” And he said to him: “Rise and go your way; your faith has made you well.”

Memorial Prayer

Georgia Mastrogianis (40 days) daughter of Alice Aspras, mother of Chris (Amy) Nikolopoulos and Alicia (Joseph) Quinones, grandmother of Angela and Morgan, sister of Dr. Ana Aspras Steele and Emmanuel (Marilyn) Aspras.

Trisagion Prayer

Sofia Glantzis (3 years) survived by her husband Philipp, son Nicholas, daughter in law Tania, and granddaughter Stefania.

George Stringos (3 years) survived by his wife Angeliki, son Emanuel, son George (Tracey), and grandson George.

Dimitrios Gigiras (5 years) survived by his daughters Evangelia Gigiras and Jane Lafata, grandchildren Patrick, Gregory and Andrew, great granddaughter Thaleia, siblings, nieces and nephews.

Constantine Anastasiou (18 years) survived by his wife Toni, his children Father Savvas and Jason, and his grandchildren Fotini, Antonios and Isabella.

Demetrios Kapakos (41 years) survived by his sons Chris (Mona) and Gus (Shelby), his daughters Stavroula (Nick) Ferrarese and Efstathia (Ted) Stout, and his grandchildren James Stout and Sarah Stout.

Antigone Pappas (5 months), Plato Pappas (7 months), Elias Asras (30 years), Anthony Aspras (37 years) beloved family of Alice Aspras.

 

 


 

Announcements

Coffee Hour

In loving memory of her daughter Georgia Mastrogianis, Alice Aspras is hosting today’s coffee hour.

 


Youth Programs News

Dear Parents,

Sunday School & Dance are canceled until 1/30/22.

When classes resume on 1/30/22, we will continue to follow the attendance policy of dancers attending both Sunday School and Dance, in order for dancers to be allowed to perform at a Spring Celebration.  The date of the celebration is to be determined.

 


Loving Stitches News

 

Due to the high number of Covid cases, we will be canceling our meeting for January.
Hopefully we can meet up in February.
Please stay happy, healthy, & safe!

 


Celebration of Learning Luncheon

The Celebration of Learning luncheon planned for January 23, 2022 is being rescheduled. The new date will be announced soon.  Thank you for your patience and understanding.

 


Philoptochos News

Philoptochos 2022 Memberships:  Annual dues are payable now.  Become a new member or renew your membership @$50 for 2022, as you support the national, metropolis and local organizations of the philanthropic arm of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese in America.  Please make checks payable to Philoptochos or use credit cards via Square.

 




Hellenic Cultural Society of South Florida 

Do you love reading and discussing old and new ideas about passion and rage, greatness and pride?

You are cordially invited to join our Book Club as we discuss the play “Medea” by Euripides. The play was written in 431 BC and was first produced in Athens at the city’s Dionysia Festival. It is one of the great plays of the Western literary canon and one of the most frequently performed Greek tragedies in the late 20th century. The play, Medea’s story of betrayal by her husband is a remarkable study of injustice and ruthless revenge. Special appearance: an actor will read a short passage and a solo dance will be presented.

You can purchase the book at the Hall, at Barnes and Noble or Amazon for $6 or download it for free.

Due to the high numbers of Omicron cases, we will meet online on Saturday January 29th at 12:30pm .
We are looking forward to seeing you.

For more information please contact Stavroula Christodoulou (954) 899-8455 or Malvina Currie (954) 993-7456 malvinacurrie@gmail.com

To purchase the book in English

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/medea-euripides/1116704718

https://us.amazon.com/Medea-Euripides/dp/B099C8R1TQ

Free
https://www.gutenberg.org/files/35451/35451-h/35451-h.htm
http://classics.mit.edu/Euripides/medea.html

Free in Greek
https://www.openbook.gr/mideia/

This event is part of the Book Club Series 2022 Hellenic Cultural Society of South Florida.

 


St. Demetrios Church in the National Herald

Read the article regarding the Epiphany Celebration.

https://www.thenationalherald.com/feast-of-the-epiphany-celebrated-in-west-palm-beach-fl

Read the article regarding Fr. Peter’s 10 year anniversary of his Ordination to the Priesthood.

https://www.thenationalherald.com/rev-fr-peter-zougras-celebrates-10-years-in-the-priesthood/?fbclid=IwAR0XsawZWJXQge0iJUXsbsjJnWLvIpnHtJCUNnnuhGHaEVgRSFDVAId59_k

 


Stewardship
Our Church.  Our Spiritual Home.  Our Family

Our St. Demetrios Church is our spiritual home. It is a place of prayer, comfort, spiritual healing, and celebration. You may have been brought here on your 40th day, or it may have been the destination of your spiritual journey. For both, St. Demetrios Church is a spiritual home to which we may always return. We are brothers and sisters in Christ – a family.

We ask you to support the worship, service and activities of our vibrant community. Giving to His Church is a way to thank God for His grace, His generosity and His many blessings.

Thank you very much for your 2021 stewardship pledge.  Your gift truly makes a difference by enabling us to serve those who come to seek Jesus Christ in His Church. Please consider increasing your pledge for 2022. Even a small increase will help us do that much more to strengthen and advance our parish.  Please fill out a year 2022 pledge form. Fill out both sides completely so that we can update our database. Thank you!

 

 

 



 


 

 

Calander

 

Sunday           1/16 
9:00am/10:00am            Orthros/Divine Liturgy

No Sunday School
No Dance Practice

1:00pm-2:00pm              Bible Study

Monday       1/17
4:15pm-6:00pm           Greek Classes A’,B’, Γ’, Δ’ & Adult Beginner @ church
6:30pm-7:30pm           Intermediate Modern Greek -Zoom

Tuesday      1/18 
7:00pm                        Adv. Modern Greek-Zoom

Thursday     1/20           
7:00pm                        Adv. Modern Greek-Zoom

Sunday        1/23
9:00am/10:00am            Orthros/Divine Liturgy

No Sunday School
No Dance Practice

1:00pm-2:00pm              Bible Study

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Divine Liturgy – 01/09/2022

Click here – to Light a Candle

The Liturgical Guide and Bulletin for Sunday, January 9th, 2022

 

Epiphany Celebration

The South Florida District Epiphany Celebration is Saturday, January 8, 2022
at
St. Catherine Church ~ 110 Southern Blvd ~ West Palm Beach.
Orthros at 9AM ~ Archieratical Divine Liturgy at 10AM ~ Cross Dive at 12PM ~ Luncheon to follow

 

 


January 9, 2022
Sunday after Epiphany

 

Venerable Eustratius the Wonderworker

 

He was born to pious parents in Tarsia in Bithynia. At the age of twenty he entered monastic life at the Monastery of Agaures near his home. There he became a model of prayer, ascesis and zeal for holiness — he possessed nothing but the cloak he wore, and did not even have his own cell, choosing instead to sleep on the bare ground. When he slept he would not lie on his back or his left side, but always on his right side. In church, he stood repeating ‘Lord, have mercy!’ to himself throughout the services. He was ordained to the priesthood, and in time was made abbot of the community. But just at that time, Leo the Armenian became Emperor and revived the iconoclast heresy. The monks of Agaures, who held to the Orthodox Faith, scattered to caves and forests to escape persecution. Eustratius himself was imprisoned for a time, and was only able to re-gather the community and resume its direction when Leo died and Orthodoxy was restored in 842.

As abbot, Eustratius continued to live as the humblest of the brethren, spending the day sharing in their manual labor, and most of the night in prayer and prostrations. He often traveled among the dependencies of his large monastery to offer counsel and encouragement to the brethren. While traveling he would often give his coat or even his horse to anyone in need whom he met on the way. Once he gave the monastery’s only ox to a peasant who had lost his own. Once, on a visit to Constantinople, he was given a large sum of money by the Emperor for the monastery; on the way back he distributed all of it to the poor. Once, on the road, he met a man who had despaired because of his sins and was about to hang himself. The Saint took the man’s hand and said ‘My child, may the weight of your sins lie on me from now on. On the day of Judgment, I will answer for them instead of you. Only throw away this rope and hope in God.’

During his own life, Saint Eustratius performed countless miracles by his prayers: healing the sick, quenching fires, raising the dead. He reposed in peace in Constantinople at the age of ninety-five, having spent seventy-five years in monastic life.

Philip, Metropolitan of Moscow

Our Father among the Saints Philip, Metropolitan of Moscow, was born in 1507 of noble family, and served for a time in the royal court. While still a young man, he secretly left Moscow and entered Solovki Monastery in the north, about the year 1538, a little over a hundred years after its founding.  Because of his spiritual stature he was chosen against his will to succeed Abbot Alexis in 1548. As abbot, Philip was a great builder and beautifier of Solovki Monastery. He laid the foundations for the Cathedral of the Transfiguration, constructed cells, hermitages, and a hospital for the monks and for pilgrims, established a cattle yard on one of the islands, drained swamps and connected waterways by a series of canals and damns, built a mill and various workshops, and even invented ingenious machines and implements to help the monks in their work. His fame spread, and in 1566, by the will of Tsar Ivan IV, he was raised to the rank of Metropolitan of Moscow.

Tsar Ivan the Terrible revered Philip, even as Herod had revered Saint John the Baptist, and he had been a generous benefactor of Solovki Monastery. But because the Tsar had established the oprichnina, a state within a state, giving power to the oprichniki, who used it to oppress and rob the innocent, Philip told him the he could not be Metropolitan if the Tsar suffered the oprichniki to continue in power.  This angered the Tsar, he told Philip that it was not for him to interfere in matters of state, and many hierarchs prevailed upon Philip to accept the Metropolitan’s throne. But as the horrors committed by the oprichniki grew worse-thefts, false accusations, murders, and all manner of injustice and rapacity, with the knowledge of the Sovereign- Saint Philip could not remain silent. He rebuked the Tsar once and again for the reign of terror that he had brought upon his own people. The Tsar warned him to hold his peace and bless him to do as he wished.  The Metropolitan answered that his silence brought sin upon the Sovereign. The Tsar threatened him with his wrath, and told him to resign his throne if he were not willing to comply. Saint Philip answered that he had not sought the Metropolitan’s throne, and it was the Tsar who had deprived him of his hermitage on Solovki; but now the pastoral burden was upon him, he would not remain silent when the canons of the Church were broken.

The more the Tsar threatened Philip with his wrath, the more the holy hierarch stood fast and threatened the Tsar with judgment of God; Philip alone had the courage to rebuke the Tsar openly and oppose his iniquity. Finally the Tsar, finding false witnesses against Philip in his own monastery on Solovki, held a council against him in early November, 1568; the Saint had to endure the persecution of the Tsar who had torn him from his beloved monastery, the betrayal of his fellow hierarchs, and the slanders of his own spiritual children. He was imprisoned in Moscow, but because of the love of the people for him the Tsar feared him even in prison, and he was transferred to a monastery in Tver, where he spent a year in great hardships and continual prayer. On December 23, 1569, a royal messenger came, asking the Metropolitan’s blessing for the Tsar’s expedition to Novgorod. Saint Philip told him to do that which he came to do, then raised his hands in prayer to God. The Tsar’s messenger fell upon him and suffocated the holy hierarch with a pillow. In 1591 his relics were transferred to Solovki, and in 1652 to the Dormition Cathedral in Moscow; many miracles were wrought through his holy relics.

 

 


 

Liturgical Guide

Resurrectional Apolytikion in the Fourth Mode
Τὸ φαιδρὸν τῆς Ἀναστάσεως κήρυγμα…
Having learned the joyful proclamation of the Resurrection from the Angel, and having cast off the ancestral condemnation, the women disciples of the Lord spake to the Apostles exultantly:  Death is despoiled and Christ God is risen, granting great mercy to the world.
Reading is under copyright and is used with permission, all rights reserved by: Holy Transfiguration Monastery

Apolytikion for Afterfeast of Theophany in the First Mode
Ἐν Ἰορδάνῃ βαπτιζομένου σου Κύριε…
When Thou wast baptized in the Jordan, O Lord, the worship of the Trinity was made manifest; for the voice of the Father bare witness to Thee, calling Thee His beloved Son.  And the Spirit in the form of a dove confirmed the certainty of the word.  O Christ our God, Who hast appeared and hast enlightened the world, glory be to Thee.
Reading is under copyright and is used with permission, all rights reserved by: Holy Transfiguration Monastery

Apolytikion of St. Demetrios in the Third Mode
Μέγαν εύρατο εv τοίς κιvδύvοις…
Greatness has been found in danger.  You are champion of the world.  A victor who could turn the nations back.  You boldly encouraged Nestor to defeat Lyaeus in the arena.  Therefore, holy great martyr Demetrios, intercede with Christ our God, to grant us His great mercy.
Reading is under copyright and is used with permission, all rights reserved by: Holy Transfiguration Monastery

Seasonal Kontakion in the Fourth Mode
Ἐπεφάνης σήμερον τὴ οἰκουμένη…
You appeared to the world today, and Your light, O Lord, has left its mark upon us. With fuller understanding we sing to You: “You came, You were made manifest, the unapproachable light.”
Reading is under copyright and is used with permission, all rights reserved by: Narthex Press

Epistle Reading

Prokeimenon. First Mode. Psalm 32.22,1.
Let your mercy, O Lord, be upon us.
Verse: Rejoice in the Lord, O ye righteous.

The reading is from St. Paul’s Letter to the Ephesians 4:7-13

BRETHREN, grace was given to each of us according to the measure of Christ’s gift. Therefore it is said, “When he ascended on high he led a host of captives, and he gave gifts to men.” (in saying, “He ascended,” what does it mean but that he had also descended into the lower parts of the earth? He who descended is he who also ascended far above all the heavens, that he might fill all things.) And his gifts were that some should be apostles, some prophets, some evangelists, some pastors and teachers, to equip the saints for the work of ministry, for building up the body of Christ, until we all attain to the unity of the faith and of the knowledge of the Son of God, to mature manhood, to the measure of the stature of the fullness of Christ.

Gospel Reading

The reading is from Matthew 4:12-17

At that time, when Jesus heard that John had been arrested, he withdrew into Galilee; and leaving Nazareth he went and dwelt in Capernaum by the sea, in the territory of Zebulun and Naphtali, that what was spoken by the prophet Isaiah might be fulfilled: “The land of Zebulun and the land of Naphtali, toward the sea, across the Jordan, Galilee of the Gentiles, the people who sat in darkness have seen a great light, and for those who sat in the region and shadow of death light has dawned.”  From that time Jesus began to preach, saying, “Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand.”

 

 

 

 


 

Announcements

Youth Programs News

Parents – based on the current Covid positivity rate of over 20% in Broward County, be advised that any children who have cold symptoms will not be admitted to any of the youth programs. Additionally, masks are strongly suggested. Thank you.

 


It is with regret that we announce that this year’s festival has been cancelled.  This decision was made in the interest of public health and for well being concerns.  We thank all the volunteers who had been tirelessly working planning the festival and all those who had signed up to work the festival.

 


Celebration of Learning Luncheon

The Celebration of Learning luncheon planned for January 23, 2022 is being rescheduled. The new date will be announced soon.  Thank you for your patience and understanding.

 

 


Philoptochos News
Philoptochos 2022 Memberships:  Annual dues are payable now.  Become a new member or renew your membership @$50 for 2022, as you support the national, metropolis and local organizations of the philanthropic arm of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese in America.  Please make checks payable to Philoptochos or use credit cards via Square.

 

 




 


Stewardship
Our Church.  Our Spiritual Home.  Our Family

Our St. Demetrios Church is our spiritual home. It is a place of prayer, comfort, spiritual healing, and celebration. You may have been brought here on your 40th day, or it may have been the destination of your spiritual journey. For both, St. Demetrios Church is a spiritual home to which we may always return. We are brothers and sisters in Christ – a family.

We ask you to support the worship, service and activities of our vibrant community. Giving to His Church is a way to thank God for His grace, His generosity and His many blessings.

Thank you very much for your 2021 stewardship pledge.  Your gift truly makes a difference by enabling us to serve those who come to seek Jesus Christ in His Church. Please consider increasing your pledge for 2022. Even a small increase will help us do that much more to strengthen and advance our parish.  Please fill out a year 2022 pledge form. Fill out both sides completely so that we can update our database. Thank you!

 

 

 



 


 

District Epiphany Celebration

 

Calander

Saturday      1/8   
9:00am                         Epiphany celebration
West Palm Beach

1:00pm-5:00pm            HDF practice in the Hall

Sunday           1/9 
9:00am/10:00am            Orthros/Divine Liturgy

After Communion           Sunday School

12:45pm-1:30pm            Jr. Palazakia
Upstairs classrooms
12:45pm-1:30pm            Palazakia
Upstairs classrooms
1:00pm-2:00pm              Sr. Palazakia @ ArtServe

1:00pm -2:00pm             Kamaria  @ ArtServe

2:30pm -3:30pm             HDF in the Hall

1:00pm-2:00pm              Bible Study

Monday       1/10
4:15pm-6:00pm           Greek Classes A’,B’, Γ’, Δ’ & Adult Beginner @ church
6:30pm-7:30pm           Intermediate Modern Greek -Zoom

Tuesday      1/11 
7:00pm                        Adv. Modern Greek-Zoom

Wednesday  1/12
6:30pm                        Daughters of Penelope

Thursday     1/13           
7:00pm                        Adv. Modern Greek-Zoom

Sunday        1/16
9:00am/10:00am          Orthros/Divine Liturgy

After Communion           Sunday School

12:45pm-1:30pm            Jr. Palazakia
Upstairs classrooms
12:45pm-1:30pm            Palazakia
Upstairs classrooms
1:00pm-2:00pm              Sr. Palazakia @ ArtServe

1:00pm -2:00pm             Kamaria  @ ArtServe

2:30pm -3:30pm             HDF in the Hall

1:00pm-2:00pm              Bible Study

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Liturgical Guide and Bulletin for Sunday, January 2nd, 2022

 

Upcoming Feast Day Services 

New Year’s Day 
Join us, Saturday, January 1, 2022 as we celebrate the Feast of Saint Basil.
Orthros 9:00am ~ Divine Liturgy 10:00am

Holy Theophany/Epiphany 
Thursday, January 6, 2022
Orthros 9:00am ~ Divine Liturgy and Blessing of the Water 10:00am

Epiphany Celebration
The South Florida District Epiphany Celebration is Saturday, January 8, 2022
at
St. Catherine Church ~ 110 Southern Blvd ~ West Palm Beach.
Orthros at 9AM ~ Archieratical Divine Liturgy at 10AM ~ Cross Dive at 12PM ~ Luncheon to follow

 


January 2, 2022
Sunday before Epiphany

 


Seraphim the Wonderworker of Sarov

 

Saint Seraphim was born in the town of Kursk in 1759. From tender childhood he was under the protection of the most holy Mother of God, who, when he was nine years old, appeared to him in a vision, and through her icon of Kursk, healed him from a grave sickness from which he had not been expected to recover. At the age of nineteen he entered the monastery of Sarov, where he amazed all with his obedience, his lofty asceticism, and his great humility. In 1780 the Saint was stricken with a sickness which he manfully endured for three years, until our Lady the Theotokos healed him, appearing to him with the Apostles Peter and John. He was tonsured a monk in 1786, being named for the holy Hieromartyr Seraphim, Bishop of Phanarion (Dec. 4), and was ordained deacon a year later. In his unquenchable love for God, he continually added labours to labours, increasing in virtue and prayer with titan strides. Once, during the Divine Liturgy of Holy and Great Thursday, he was counted worthy of a vision of the Lord Jesus Christ, Who appeared encompassed by the heavenly hosts. After this dread vision, he gave himself over to greater labours.  In 1794, Saint Seraphim took up the solitary life in a cell in the forest. This period of extreme asceticism lasted some fifteen years, until 1810. It was at this time that he took upon himself one of the greatest feats of his life. Assailed with despondency and a storm of contrary thoughts raised by the enemy of our salvation, the Saint passed a thousand nights on a rock, continuing in prayer until God gave him complete victory over the enemy. On another occasion, he was assaulted by robbers, who broke his chest and his head with their blows, leaving him almost dead. Here again, he began to recover after an appearance of the most holy Theotokos, who came to him with the Apostles Peter and John, and pointing to Saint Seraphim, uttered those awesome words, “This is one of my kind.”  In 1810, at the age of fifty; weakened with his more than human struggles, Saint Seraphim returned to the monastery for the third part of his ascetical labours, in which he lived as a recluse until 1825. For the first five years of his reclusion, he spoke to no one at all, and little is known of this period. After five years, he began receiving visitors little by little, giving counsel and consolation to ailing souls. In 1825, the most holy Theotokos appeared to the Saint and revealed to him that it was pleasing to God that he fully end his seclusion; from this time the number of people who came to see him grew daily. It was also at the command of the holy Virgin that he undertook the spiritual direction of the Diveyevo Convent. He healed bodily ailments, foretold things to come, brought hardened sinners to repentance, and saw clearly the secrets of the heart of those who came to him. Through his utter humility and childlike simplicity, his unrivalled ascetical travails, and his angel-like love for God, he ascended to the holiness and greatness of the ancient God-bearing Fathers and became like Anthony for Egypt, the physician for the whole Russian land. In all, the most holy Theotokos appeared to him twelve times in his life. The last was on Annunciation, 1831, to announce to him that he would soon, enter into his rest. She appeared to him accompanied by twelve virgins-martyrs and monastic saints-with Saint John the Baptist and Saint John the Theologian. With a body ailing and broken from innumerable hardships, and an unspotted soul shining with the light of Heaven, the Saint lived less than two years after this, falling asleep in peace on January 2, 1833, chanting Paschal hymns. On the night of his repose, the righteous Philaret of the Glinsk Hermitage beheld his soul ascending to Heaven in light. Because of the universal testimony to the singular holiness of his life, and the seas of miracles that he performed both in life and after death, his veneration quickly spread beyond the boundaries of the Russian Empire to every corner of the earth.

 

 

 


 

Liturgical Guide

 

Resurrectional Apolytikion in the Third Mode
Εὐφραινέσθω τὰ οὐράνια…
Let the Heavens rejoice; let earthly things be glad; for the Lord hath wrought might with His arm, He hath trampled upon death by death.  The first-born of the dead hath He become.  From the belly of Hades hath He delivered us, and hath granted great mercy to the world.
Reading is under copyright and is used with permission, all rights reserved by: Holy Transfiguration Monastery

Apolytikion for Forfeast of Epiphany in the Fourth Mode
Ἑτοιμάζου Ζαβουλῶν…
Be thou ready, Zabulon; prepare thyself, O Nephthalim.  River Jordan, stay thy course and skip for gladness to receive the Sovereign Master, Who cometh now to be baptized.  O Adam, be thou glad with our first mother, Eve; hide not as ye did of old in Paradise.  Seeing you naked, He hath appeared now to clothe you in the first robe again.  Christ hath appeared, for He truly willeth to renew all creation.
Reading is under copyright and is used with permission, all rights reserved by: Holy Transfiguration Monastery

Apolytikion of St. Demetrios in the Third Mode
Μέγαν εύρατο εv τοίς κιvδύvοις…
Greatness has been found in danger.  You are champion of the world.  A victor who could turn the nations back.  You boldly encouraged Nestor to defeat Lyaeus in the arena.  Therefore, holy great martyr Demetrios, intercede with Christ our God, to grant us His great mercy.
Reading is under copyright and is used with permission, all rights reserved by: Holy Transfiguration Monastery

Seasonal Kontakion in the Fourth Mode
Ἐν τοῖς ῥείθροις σήμερον τοῦ Ἰορδάνου…
In the running waters of the Jordan River, on this day the Lord of all crieth to John:  Be not afraid and hesitate not to baptize Me, for I am come to save Adam, the first-formed man.
Reading is under copyright and is used with permission, all rights reserved by: Holy Transfiguration Monastery

Epistle Reading

Prokeimenon. Plagal Second Mode. Psalm 27.9,1.
O Lord, save your people and bless your inheritance.
Verse: To you, O Lord, I have cried, O my God.

The reading is from St. Paul’s Letter to Timothy 4:5-8

TIMOTHY, my son, always be steady, endure suffering, do the work of an evangelist, fulfil your ministry.For I am already on the point of being sacrificed; the time of my departure has come.  I have fought the good fight, I have finished the race, I have kept the faith.  Henceforth there is laid up for me the crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous judge, will award to me on that Day, and not only to me but also to all who have loved his appearing.

Gospel Reading

The reading is from Mark 1:1-8

The beginning of the Gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God. As it is written in the prophets, ‘Behold, I send my messenger before your face, who shall prepare your way; the voice of one crying in the wilderness: prepare the way of the Lord, make his paths straight.’ John was baptizing in the wilderness, preaching a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins. And there went out to him all the country of Judea, and all the people of Jerusalem; and they were baptized by him in the river Jordan, confessing their sins. Now John was clothed with camel’s hair, and had a leather girdle around his waist, and ate locusts and wild honey. And he preached, saying, “After me comes he who is mightier than I, the thong of whose sandals I am not worthy to stoop down and untie. I have baptized you with water; but he will baptize you with the Holy Spirit.”

Trisagion Prayer

Mitchell James Thermis (1 year) husband of Loretta, father of Albert, brother of Sophia Thermis, and uncle of 4 generations of nieces and nephews.

Markos Hatzikostantis (2 years) survived by his wife Dina, his children Michael and Antonia, and his grandchildren Konstantina, Theodosios, Michael and Gabrielle.

Orlando Haralambos Perez ( 8 years) survived by his daughter Nicole Perez and by Michael Valverde.

 

 

 


 

Coffee Hour

In memory of her husband Markos Hatzikostantis, Dina Hatzikostantis has sponsored the coffee hour.

Parish Vasilopita

This Sunday we will cut the traditional Vasilopita.  Please give generously to benefit St. Basil’s Academy, one of the oldest institutions of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese.  St. Basil’s offers a safe home and education to orphans and children whose parents are unable to care for them.

 


FESTIVAL Volunteers 2022…WELCOME BACK one of ST DEMETRIOS’ BEST FELLOWSHIP MINISTRIES & FUNDRAISERS!  EACH of YOU make this all possible.
Volunteers are needed to assist in Food Prep *  Setting up the festival grounds * Cashiers * Bakery * Volunteer Table and so much more…Come see us in the narthex and SIGN UP TODAY!

 


HDF News

Our Hellenic Dance Festival Team luncheon planned for today, to help raise funds for their upcoming competition in Orlando, has been POSTPONED to a later date.

 


Philoptochos News

Philoptochos 2022 Memberships:  Annual dues are payable now.  Become a new member or renew your membership @$50 for 2022, as you support the national, metropolis and local organizations of the philanthropic arm of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese in America.  Please make checks payable to Philoptochos or use credit cards via Square.

 




 


Stewardship
Our Church.  Our Spiritual Home.  Our Family

Our St. Demetrios Church is our spiritual home. It is a place of prayer, comfort, spiritual healing, and celebration. You may have been brought here on your 40th day, or it may have been the destination of your spiritual journey. For both, St. Demetrios Church is a spiritual home to which we may always return. We are brothers and sisters in Christ – a family.

We ask you to support the worship, service and activities of our vibrant community. Giving to His Church is a way to thank God for His grace, His generosity and His many blessings.

Thank you very much for your 2021 stewardship pledge.  Your gift truly makes a difference by enabling us to serve those who come to seek Jesus Christ in His Church. Please consider increasing your pledge for 2022. Even a small increase will help us do that much more to strengthen and advance our parish.  Please fill out a year 2022 pledge form. Fill out both sides completely so that we can update our database. Thank you!

 

 



 


 

District Epiphany Celebration

 

Calander

Sunday         1/2 
9:00am/10:00am          Orthros/Divine Liturgy
Parish Vasilopita
No Sunday School
No Dance practice
No HDF practice

1:00pm-2:00pm           Bible Study

Monday     1/3
4:15pm-6:00pm           Greek Classes A’,B’, Γ’, Δ’ & Adult Beginner @ church
6:30pm-7:30pm           Intermediate Modern Greek -Zoom

Tuesday    1/4 
7:00pm                        Adv. Modern Greek-Zoom

Thursday   1/6           Holy Theophany
9:00am/10:00am        Orthros/Divine Liturgy/
Blessing of the Water

7:00pm                      Adv. Modern Greek-Zoom

Saturday    1/8   
9:00am                        Epiphany celebration
West Palm Beach

1:00pm-5:00pm           HDF practice in the Hall

Sunday        1/9
9:00am/10:00am          Orthros/Divine Liturgy

After Communion         Sunday School

12:45pm-1:30pm            Jr. Palazakia
Upstairs classrooms
12:45pm-1:30pm            Palazakia
Upstairs classrooms
1:00pm-2:00pm              Sr. Palazakia @ ArtServe

1:00pm -2:00pm             Kamaria  @ ArtServe

2:30pm -3:30pm             HDF in the Hall

1:00pm-2:00pm              Bible Study

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Divine Liturgy – 12/26/2021

Click here – to Light a Candle

The Liturgical Guide and Bulletin for Sunday, December 26th, 2021

 


Merry Christmas!

Christmas Worship at St. Demetrios Church
Join us on Christmas Eve, Friday, December 24, 2021 as we celebrate the Nativity.
Orthros 6:00pm ~ Divine Liturgy 7:00pm


December 26, 2021
Sunday after the Nativity

 

On the Sunday that falls on or immediately after the twenty-sixth of this month, we make commemoration of Saints Joseph, the Betrothed of the Virgin; David, the Prophet and King; and James, the Brother of God.  When there is no Sunday within this period, we celebrate this commemoration on the 26th.

Saint Joseph (whose name means “one who increases”) was the son of Jacob, and the son-in-law – and hence, as it were, the son – of Eli (who was also called Eliakim or Joachim), who was the father of Mary the Virgin (Matt. 1:16; Luke 3:23). He was of the tribe of Judah, of the family of David, an inhabitant of Nazareth, a carpenter by Trade, and advanced in age when, by God’s good will, he was betrothed to the Virgin, that he might minister to the great mystery of God’s dispensation in the flesh by protecting her, providing for her, and being known as her husband so that she, being a virgin, would not suffer reproach when she was found to be with child. Joseph had been married before his betrothal to our Lady; they who are called Jesus’ “brethren and sisters” (Matt. 13:55-56) are the children of Joseph by his first marriage. From Scripture, we know that Saint Joseph lived at least until the Twelfth year after the birth of Christ (Luke 2:41-52); according to the tradition of the Fathers, he reposed before the beginning of the public ministry of Christ.

The child of God and ancestor of God, David, the great Prophet after Moses, sprang from the tribe of Judah. He was the son of Jesse, and was born in Bethlehem (whence it is called the City of David), in the year 1085 before Christ. While yet a youth, at the command of God he was anointed secretly by the Prophet Samuel to be the second King of the Israelites, while Saul – who had already been deprived of divine grace – was yet living. In the thirtieth year of his life, when Saul had been slain in battle, David was raised to the dignity of King, first, by his own tribe, and then by all the Israelite people, and he reigned for forty years. Having lived seventy years, he reposed in 1015 before Christ, having proclaimed beforehand that his son Solomon was to be the successor to the throne.

The sacred history has recorded not only the grace of the Spirit that dwelt in him from his youth, his heroic exploits in war, and his great piety towards God, but also his transgressions and failings as a man. Yet his repentance was greater than his transgresssions, and his love for God fervent and exemplary; so highly did God honour this man, that when his son Solomon sinned, the Lord told him that He would not rend the kingdom in his lifetime “for David thy father’s sake” (III Kings 12:12). Of The Kings of Israel, Jesus the Son of Sirach testifies, “All, except David and Hezekias and Josias, were defective” (Ecclus. 49:4). The name David means “beloved.”

His melodious Psalter is the foundation of all the services of the Church; there is not one service that is not filled with Psalms and psalmic verses. It was the means whereby old Israel praised God, and was used by the Apostles and the Lord Himself. It is so imbued with the spirit of prayer that the monastic fathers of all ages have used it as their trainer and teacher for their inner life of converse with God. Besides eloquently portraying every state and emotion of the soul before her Maker, the Psalter is filled with prophecies of the coming of Christ. It foretells His Incarnation, “He bowed the heavens and came down” (Psalm 17:9), His Baptism in the Jordan, “The waters saw Thee, O God, The waters saw Thee and were afraid” (76:15), His Crucifixion in its details, “They have pierced My hands and My feet …. They have parted My garments amongst themselves, and for My vesture have they cast lots” (21:16, 18). “For My thirst they gave Me vinegar to drink” (68:26), His descent into Hades, “For Thou wilt not abandon My soul in Hades, nor wilt Thou suffer Thy Holy One to see corruption” (15:10) and Resurrection, “Let God arise and let His enemies be scattered” (67:1). His Ascension, “God is gone up in jubilation” (46:5), and so forth.

 

 


 

Liturgical Guide

 

Resurrectional Apolytikion in the Second Mode
Ὅτε κατῆλθες πρὸς τὸν θάνατον…
When Thou didst descend unto death, O Life Immortal, then didst Thou slay Hades with the lightning of Thy Divinity.  And when Thou didst also raise the dead out of the nethermost depths, all the powers in the Heavens cried out:  O Life-giver, Christ our God, glory be to Thee.
Reading is under copyright and is used with permission, all rights reserved by: Holy Transfiguration Monastery

Apolytikion for Afterfeast of the Nativity in the Fourth Mode
Ἡ γέννησίς σου Χριστὲ ὁ Θεὸς ἡμῶν…
Thy Nativity, O Christ our God, hath shined the light of knowledge upon the world; for thereby they that worshipped the stars were instructed by a star to worship Thee, the Sun of Righteousness, and to know Thee, the Dayspring from on high.  O Lord, glory be to Thee.
Reading is under copyright and is used with permission, all rights reserved by: Holy Transfiguration Monastery

Apolytikion for Sunday after Nativity in the Second Mode
Εὐαγγελίζου Ἰωσήφ…
O Joseph, proclaim the wonders to David, the ancestor of God.  Thou hast seen a Virgin great with child; thou hast given glory with the shepherds; thou hast worshipped with the Magi; and thou hast been instructed through an Angel.  Entreat Christ God to save our souls.
Reading is under copyright and is used with permission, all rights reserved by: Holy Transfiguration Monastery

Seasonal Kontakion in the Third Mode
Ἡ Παρθένος σήμερον, τὸν Προαιώνιον Λόγον…
On this day the Virgin cometh to the cave to give birth to * God the Word ineffably, * Who was before all the ages. * Dance for joy, O earth, on hearing * the gladsome tidings; * with the Angels and the shepherds now glorify Him * Who is willing to be gazed on * as a young Child Who * before the ages is God.

Epistle Reading

Prokeimenon. Fourth Mode. Psalm 67.35,26.
God is wonderful among his saints.
Verse: Bless God in the congregations.

The reading is from St. Paul’s Letter to the Galatians 1:11-19

Brethren, I would have you know that the gospel which was preached by me is not man’s gospel. For I did not receive it from man, nor was I taught it, but it came through a revelation of Jesus Christ. For you have heard of my former life in Judaism, how I persecuted the church of God violently and tried to destroy it; and I advanced in Judaism beyond many of my own age among my people, so extremely zealous was I for the traditions of my fathers. But when he who had set me apart before I was born, and had called me through his grace, was pleased to reveal his Son to me, in order that I might preach him among the Gentiles, I did not confer with flesh and blood, nor did I go up to Jerusalem to those who were apostles before me, but I went away into Arabia; and again I returned to Damascus. Then after three years I went up to Jerusalem to visit Cephas, and remained with him fifteen days. But I saw none of the other apostles except James the Lord’s brother.

Gospel Reading

The reading is from Matthew 2:13-23

When the wise men departed, behold, an angel of the Lord appeared to Joseph in a dream and said, “Rise, take the child and his mother, and flee to Egypt, and remain there till I tell you; for Herod is about to search for the child, to destroy him.” And he rose and took the child and his mother by night, and departed to Egypt, and remained there until the death of Herod. This was to fulfill what the Lord had spoken by the prophet, “Out of Egypt have I called my son.”Then Herod, when he saw that he had been tricked by the wise men, was in a furious rage, and he sent and killed all the male children in Bethlehem and in all that region who were two years old or under, according to the time which he had ascertained from the wise men. Then was fulfilled what was spoken by the prophet Jeremiah: “A voice was heard in Ramah, wailing and loud lamentation, Rachel weeping for her children; she refused to be consoled, because they were no more.” But when Herod died, behold, an angel of the Lord appeared in a dream to Joseph in Egypt, saying, “Rise, take the child and his mother, and go to the land of Israel, for those who sought the child’s life are dead.” And he rose and took the child and his mother, and went to the land of Israel. But when he heard that Archelaos reigned over Judea in place of his father Herod, he was afraid to go there, and being warned in a dream he withdrew to the district of Galilee. And he went and dwelt in a city called Nazareth, that what was spoken by the prophets might be fulfilled, “He shall be called a Nazarene.”

 

 

Memorial Prayer

 

Zaharia Haralambis (16 years) survived by his wife Clara, children Michael, Nicholas, John, and Maria, 12 grandchildren and 1 great grandchild.

Helen Kappas (40 days) survived by her son Tom (Joanne) and family.

Trisagion Prayer

Stella Vlahos (26 years) survived by her daughter Mantha Mehallis, grandson Spero (Rocio), great grandson Lazaro, and great granddaughter Phoenix Rose.

 

 


 

Coffee Hour

In memory of her mother Catherine Kourakos, Stella Androutsopoulos has sponsored the coffee hour.

 


FESTIVAL Volunteers 2022…WELCOME BACK one of ST DEMETRIOS’ BEST FELLOWSHIP MINISTRIES & FUNDRAISERS!  EACH of YOU make this all possible.
Volunteers are needed to assist in Food Prep *  Setting up the festival grounds * Cashiers * Bakery * Volunteer Table and so much more…Come see us in the narthex and SIGN UP TODAY!

 


In Search of…

As we are preparing for the festival, we are in need of full size disposable aluminium pans.  Our food service distributor has informed us that there is a shortage.  If you are out shopping and see these large pans (turkey roaster pans will also do), please buy them and submit your receipt for reimbursement. Thank you!


HDF News

SAVE THE DATE: Our Hellenic Dance Festival Team will be hosting a luncheon on Sunday, 1/2/22, to help raise funds for their upcoming competition in Orlando, during Martin Luther King weekend. They will also be performing their dance suites so please join us! The money raised will be used to help defray the cost for the families traveling to represent St. Demetrios.

 


Philoptochos News

Visiting Angels is a ministry of Philoptochos which calls and visits those in nursing homes, or assisted living facilities or who are confined to their homes.  If you know someone who would appreciate a call or visit, please email philoptochos@stdemetrios.org or give the information to Paula Kirifides or Helen Fronimakis.

 


Philoptochos 2022 Memberships:  Annual dues are payable now.  Become a new member or renew your membership @$50 for 2022, as you support the national, metropolis and local organizations of the philanthropic arm of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese in America.  Please make checks payable to Philoptochos or use credit cards via Square.




 


Stewardship
Our Church.  Our Spiritual Home.  Our Family

Our St. Demetrios Church is our spiritual home. It is a place of prayer, comfort, spiritual healing, and celebration. You may have been brought here on your 40th day, or it may have been the destination of your spiritual journey. For both, St. Demetrios Church is a spiritual home to which we may always return. We are brothers and sisters in Christ – a family.

We ask you to support the worship, service and activities of our vibrant community. Giving to His Church is a way to thank God for His grace, His generosity and His many blessings.

Thank you very much for your 2021 stewardship pledge.  Your gift truly makes a difference by enabling us to serve those who come to seek Jesus Christ in His Church. Please consider increasing your pledge for 2022. Even a small increase will help us do that much more to strengthen and advance our parish.  Please fill out a year 2022 pledge form. Fill out both sides completely so that we can update our database. Thank you!

 



 


 

District Epiphany Celebration

 

Calander

Friday, December 24                                                              Eve of the Nativity of Christ

Orthros/Divine Liturgy                                                               6:00PM/7:00PM

Sunday, December 26

Orthros/Divine Liturgy                                                               9:00AM/10:00AM

Bereavement Support Group                                                   After Divine Liturgy

No Sunday School
No Dance practice
No HDF practice
Saturday, January 1                                                                Saint Basil the Great

Orthros/Divine Liturgy                                                                9:00AM/10:00AM

Sunday, January 2 

Orthros/Divine Liturgy                                                                9:00AM/10:00AM

Luncheon  To benefit the HDF team                                         After Divine Liturgy

No Sunday School
No Dance practice
No HDF practice

Bible Study                                                                               1:00PM – 2:00PM