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Weekly Sunday Bulletin March 27, 2016

St. Gregory PalamasMarch 27, 2016

St. Gregory Palamas

This divine Father, who was from Asia Minor, was from childhood reared in the royal court of Constantinople, where he was instructed in both religious and secular wisdom. Later, while still a youth, he left the imperial court and struggled in asceticism on Mount Athos, and in the Skete at Beroea. He spent some time in Thessalonica being treated for an illness that came from his harsh manner of life. He was present in Constantinople at the Council that was convened in 1341 against Barlaam of Calabria, and at the Council of 1347 against Acindynus, who was of like mind with Barlaam; Barlaam and Acindynus claimed that the grace of God is created. At both these Councils, the Saint contended courageously for the true dogmas of the Church of Christ, teaching in particular that divine grace is not created, but is the uncreated energies of God which are poured forth throughout creation: otherwise it would be impossible, if grace were created, for man to have genuine communion with the uncreated God. In 1347 he was appointed Metropolitan of Thessalonica. He tended his flock in an apostolic manner for some twelve years, and years, and wrote many books and treatises on the most exalted doctrines of our Faith; and having lived for a total of sixty-three years, he reposed in the Lord in 1359. His holy relics are kept in the Cathedral of Thessalonica. A full service was composed for his feast day by the Patriarch Philotheus in 1368, when it was established that his feast be celebrated on this day. Since works without right faith avail nothing, we set Orthodoxy of faith as the foundation of all that we accomplish during the Fast, by celebrating the Triumph of Orthodoxy the Sunday before, and the great defender of the teachings of the holy Fathers today.

 

Parish Council on duty:

Basil Economou, Michael Fossler, George Georgakakis, Harry Tangalakis, Marion Koliniatis

Weekly Sunday Bulletin-February 28, 2016

February 28 –

Sunday of the Prodigal Son

Through today’s parable, our Saviour has set forth three things for us: the condition of the sinner, the rule of repentance, and the greatness of God’s compassion. The divine Fathers have put this reading the week after the parable of the Publican and Pharisee so that, seeing in the person of the Prodigal Son our own wretched condition — as we are sunken in sin, far from God and His Mysteries — we might at last come to our senses and make haste to return to Him by repentance during these holy days of the Fast.

Furthermore, those who have wrought many iniquities, and have persisted in them for a long time, oftentimes fall into despair, thinking that there can no longer be any forgiveness for them; and so being without hope, they fall every day into the same and even worse iniquities. Therefore, the divine Fathers, that they might root out the passion of despair from the hearts of such people, and rouse them to the deeds of virtue, have set the present parable at the forecourts of the Fast, to show them the surpassing goodness of God’s compassion, and to teach them that there is no sin — no matter how great it may be — that can overcome at any time His love for man.

 

Parish Council on Duty:               

Basil Economou,  Michael Fossler, George Georgakakis, Marion Koliniatis,  Harry Tangalakis

Weekly Sunday Bulletin – January 10 – Sunday after Theophany

Parish Council on duty:

 John Argiropoulos, John Ioannou, Jr., Tony Maiorana, Anna Merkel, Demetri Rapanos, Mark Zaden, Kathy Ziegler

 

 

Resurrectional Apolytikion in the Grave Mode

Κατέλυσας τῷ Σταυρῷ σου τὸν θάνατον…

Thou didst abolish death by Thy Cross; Thou didst open Paradise to the thief; Thou didst transform the myrrh-bearers’ lamentation, and didst bid Thine Apostles to preach that Thou art risen, O Christ God, granting great mercy to the world.

 

Apolytikion for Theophany Afterfeast in the First Mode

Ἐν Ἰορδάνῃ βαπτιζομένου σου Κύριε …

When Thou wast baptized in the Jordan, O Lord, the worship of the Trinity was made manifest; for the voice of the Father bare witness to Thee, calling Thee His beloved Son. And the Spirit in the form of a dove confirmed the certainty of the word. O Christ our God, Who hast appeared and hast enlightened the world, glory be to Thee.

 

Apolytikion of St. Demetrios in the Third Mode

Μέγαν εύρατο εv τοίς κιvδύvοις…

The world has found in you a great champion in time of peril, as you emerged the victor in routing the barbarians. For as you brought to naught the boasts of Lyaios, imparting courage to Nestor in the stadium, in like manner, holy one, great Martyr Demetrios, invoke Christ God for us, that He may grant us His great mercy.

Seasonal Kontakion in the Fourth Mode

Ἐπεφάνης σήμερον τὴ οἰκουμένη

You appeared to the world today, and Your light, O Lord, has left its mark upon us. With fuller understanding we sing to You: “You came, You were made manifest, the unapproachable light.”

 

Epistle Reading

 

The reading is from St. Paul’s Letter to the Ephesians 4:7-13.

But grace was given to each of us according to the measure of Christ’s gift.  Therefore it is said, “When he ascended on high he led a host of captives, and he gave gifts to men.” (In saying, “He ascended,” what does it mean but that he had also descended into the lower parts of the earth?  He who descended is he who also ascended far above all the heavens, that he might fill all things.)  And his gifts were that some should be apostles, some prophets, some evangelists, some pastors and teachers,  to equip the saints for the work of ministry, for building up the body of Christ,  until we all attain to the unity of the faith and of the knowledge of the Son of God, to mature manhood, to the measure of the stature of the fulness of Christ;

 

Gospel Reading

 

Sunday after Epiphany

The Reading is from Matthew 4:12-17

 Now when he heard that John had been arrested, he withdrew into Galilee;  and leaving Nazareth he went and dwelt in Capernaum by the sea, in the territory of Zebulun and Naphtali,  that what was spoken by the prophet Isaiah might be fulfilled:  “The land of Zebulun and the land of Naphtali, toward the sea, across the Jordan, Galilee of the Gentiles,  the people who sat in darkness have seen a great light, and for those who sat in the region and shadow of death light has dawned.”  From that time Jesus began to preach, saying, “Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand.”

 

Memorials

 

Kostas Giannomoros (5yrs) survived by his wife Panayiota and son Panayiotis

 Alexandros Argiropoulos (8yrs) survived by parents John & Monica and siblings Daniella, Kirk & Monique

 

In memory of their beloved son Alexandros, John and Monica Argiropoulos have donated the flowers on the Altar and have sponsored the coffee hour

Weekly Sunday Bulletin – January 3 – Sunday before Theophany

Epiphany, or Theophany

TheophanyTheophany, after Easter and Pentecost is the greatest feast of the Orthodox church. It is even greater than the feast of the Nativity of Christ. It commemorates the baptism of our Lord by John in the waters of the Jordan and now more generally, the public manifestation of the incarnate Word to the world.

St. Proclus, the Patriarch of Constantinople puts into the mouth of St. John the Baptist, the following words expressing the faith of holy church in the divinity of Christ: “How dare I stretch forth my hand and place it on the heads of Him who sustains all things? How dare I touch Him before whom the choirs of angels tremble? How dare I approach Him whom the Seraphim dare not come near? Hence with awe they cry: holy, holy, holy, holy,. Truly heaven is filled with your glory and the earth with your wonders: How dare I approach the Unapproachable One before whom tremble the Cherubim and all the heavenly hosts? How dare I baptize the creator of nature? How dare I baptize him to whom the Pure Virgin Mary gave birth and after giving birth remained a virgin? I can only say; You O Lord, are the master…”

Daily Vitamins for Spiritual Growth by Anthony M. Coniaris

Parish Council on duty:

Manny Daskos, Basil Economou, Michael Fossler, George Georgakakis, Marion Koliniatis, Harry Tangalakis

Weekly Sunday Bulletin-December 27-Sunday after the Nativity

Stephen_Archdeacon and First MartyrDecember 27- Stephen the Archdeacon & First Martyr

Saint Stephen was a Jew, and, as some say, a disciple of Gamaliel, the teacher of the Law mentioned in Acts 5:34 and 22:3. He was the first of the seven deacons whom the Apostles established in Jerusalem to care for the poor, and to distribute alms to them. Being a man full of faith and of the Holy Spirit, he performed great signs and wonders. While disputing with the Jews concerning Jesus, and refuting their every contradiction, he was slandered as a blasphemer and was dragged off to the Sanhedrin of the elders. There with boldness he proved from the divine Scriptures the coming of the Just One (Jesus), of Whom they had become the betrayers and murderers, and he reproved their faithless and hardheartedness. And finally, gazing into Heaven and beholding the divine glory, he said: “Lo, I see the Heavens opened and the Son of man standing at the right hand of God.” But when they heard this, they stopped up their ears, and with anger cast him out of the city and stoned him, while he was calling out and saying, “Lord Jesus, receive my spirit.” Then, imitating the long-suffering of the Master, he bent his knees and prayed in a loud voice for them that were stoning him, and he said, “Lord, lay not this sin to their charge,” And saying this, he fell asleep (Acts 6, 7), thus becoming the first among the Martyrs of the Church of Christ.

Parish Council on duty:

 John Argiropoulos, John Ioannou, Jr., Tony Maiorana, Anna Merkel, Demetri Rapanos, Mark Zaden, Kathy Ziegler