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Weekly Sunday Bulletin – Fathers of the First Ecumenical Council

Father's of the First Ecumenical CouncilMay 24, 2015

The Church was strengthened into one faith through the preaching of the Apostles and the doctrines of the Fathers. The Church is robed in truth woven of the word of God from above. It teaches truth, and glorifies the great mystery of faith.

Kontakion in the Plagal of the Fourth Tone

Parish Council on Duty

George Georgakakis, Manny Daskos, Eleni Varvoutis, Mihali Haralambis, Michael Fossler, Juanita Antley, Marion Koliniatis

Weekly Sunday Bulletin – Judgement Sunday

Judgement SundayFebruary 15, 2015

“It is the aim of the holy Fathers, through bringing to mind that fearful day, to rouse us from the slumber of carelessness unto the work of virtue, and to move us to love and compassion for our brethren. Besides this, even as on the coming Sunday of Cheese-fare we commemorate Adam’s exile from the Paradise of delight — which exile is the beginning of life as we know it now — it is clear that today’s is reckoned the last of all feasts, because on the last day of judgment, truly, everything of this world will come to an end

Parish Council on Duty

George Georgakakis, Manny Daskos, Eleni Varvoutis, Mihali Haralambis, Michael Fossler, Juanita Antley, Marion Koliniatis

Weekly Sunday Bulletin – Judgement Sunday

Judgement SundayFebruary 23, 2014

Meat-fare Sunday

“It is the aim of the holy Fathers, through bringing to mind that fearful day, to rouse us from the slumber of carelessness unto the work of virtue, and to move us to love and compassion for our brethren. Besides this, even as on the coming Sunday of Cheese-fare we commemorate Adam’s exile from the Paradise of delight — which exile is the beginning of life as we know it now — it is clear that today’s is reckoned the last of all feasts, because on the last day of judgment, truly, everything of this world will come to an end.”

Parish Council on duty:

John Ioannou, Jr., John Argiropoulos, Andreas Ioannou, Marion Koliniatis, Anna Merkel, Demetri Rapanos, Peter Synoyannis, Kathy Ziegler

Weekly Sunday Bulletin – Sunday of Orthodoxy

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Sunday of Orthodoxy

A feast of joy and gladness is revealed to us    today! For the teachings of the true Faith shine forth in all their glory, and the Church of Christ is bright with splendor, adorned with the holy Icons which now have been restored; and God has granted to the faithful unity of mind.

Orthros– Sunday of Orthodoxy

 

Parish Council on Duty:

Manny Daskos, George Georgakakis, Michael Haralambis, John Ioannou Jr., Delcho Ogorelkoff, Demetrios Rapanos,Kevin Ryan, Kathy Ziegler

Liturgical – Sunday of Orthodoxy

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Apolytikion Ήχος A-1

Τού λίθου σφραγισθέντος…
The stone that had been sealed before Your tomb by the Jews and the soldiers guarding did watch o’er Your pure and sacred body O Savior the third day You arose, and unto all the world did You give life whereby all the heavenly powers did proclaim that You are the giver of life Glory unto our resurrected Christ. Glory unto Your Kingdom, Glory to Your dispensation. O You alone who loves all.

Apolytikion of St. Demetrios

Μέγαν εύρατο έν τοίς κινδύνοις…
The world found in you a great champion in dangers a victor who could turn the nations back! As you restrained Levi in the arena, you also inspired Nestor to courage! Therefore, holy, great martyr, Demetrios, entreat Christ God to grant us great mercy!

Kontakion

Τῇ ὑπερμάχῳ Στρατηγῷ τὰ νικητήρια…
To you, Theotokos, invincible Defender, having been delivered from peril, I your city, dedicate the victory festival as a thank offering. In your irresistible might, keep me safe from all trials, that I may call out to you: “Hail, unwedded bride!”

First Sunday of Lent – Sunday of Orthodoxy

There are three major Christian denominations in the world today: Orthodoxy, Roman Catholicism and Protestanism. Each has its own customs and traditions. The Protestant Churches have eliminated most of their customs, traditions and symbols during the last 400 years. The Roman Catholics adorn their Churches with religious statues. Orthodox Christians grace their Churches with Holy Icons. Iconography (the painting of Holy pictures) does not have as its aim to reproduce a saint or an incident from the Gospel or the lives of the saints, but rather to express them symbolically, to impart to them a spiritual character. In Byzantine Iconography the saint is not represented as he is in actual life, that is naturalistically, but as he is now in the heavenly kingdom, as he is in eternity. This is called Liturgical art.

A noted writer once said about our art as he visited our most famous Church (St.Sophia which is now in the hands of the Turks in Constantinople), “Below the dome of St. Sophia I felt that the Byzantine idea has a world wide mission. Never in all the evolution of human art have painters succeeded in spreading the heaven before us so superbly, so truly, so profoundly at no other time did the feeling of rhythm and artistic knowledge find such a mature expression; at no time was art so living and real.” Western painters paint with their eyes’ the Byzantine painters paint with their heart and soul.

These Holy pictures called Icons have always graced our Churches since the Apostolic age. During the seventh century, a Byzantine Emperor attempted to remove all Icons from our Churches believing that Icons should not be worshipped but only God. He actually succeeded in doing away with the Icons, and for over 150 years Orthodox Christians were banned from using Icons in any many, shape or form in the Churches and on March 11, 843 AD a great celebration was held in the Church of St. Sophia. There was a great meeting held during that period which defined the position of the Icon in Orthodox worship. The Icons produce within us a sense of repentance of our sins which sanctifies our soul. They are spiritual mirrors through which we see the Heavenly Saints. They are the symbol of our faith in Jesus Christ in accordance with our Orthodox tradition. This is why this Sunday of the restoration of the Icons in our Churches is called “Sunday of Orthodoxy” It is truly a victory for Orthodoxy which has withstood for almost 2000 years. The Sunday of Orthodoxy is celebrated all over the world and is one of the most important feast days of our Faith.

(Lives of the Saints and Major Feast Days by Rev. Fr. George Poulos)

Scripture Readings

Epistle Reading

St. Paul’s Letter to the Hebrews 11:24-26, 32-40

Brethren, by faith Moses, when he was grown up, refused to be called the son of Pharaoh’s daughter, choosing rather to share ill-treatment with the people of God than to enjoy the fleeting pleasures of sin.
And what more shall I say? For time would fail me to tell of Gideon, Barak, Samson, Jephthah, of David and Samuel and the prophets — who through faith conquered kingdoms, enforced justice, received promises, stopped the mouths of lions, quenched raging fire, escaped the edge of the sword, won strength out of weakness, became mighty in war, put foreign enemies to flight. Women received their dead by resurrection. Some were tortured, refusing to accept release, that they might rise again to a better life. Others suffered mocking and scourging, and even chains and imprisonment. They were stoned, they were sawn in two, they were killed with the sword; they went about in skins of sheep and goats, destitute, afflicted, ill-treated — of whom the world was not worthy — wandering over deserts and mountains, and in dens and caves of the earth.
And all these, though well attested by their faith, did not receive what was promised, since God had foreseen something better for us, that apart from us they should not be made perfect.

Gospel Reading

John 1:43-51
Sunday of Orthodoxy

At that time, Jesus decided to go to Galilee. And he found Philip and said to him, “Follow me.” Now Philip was from Bethsaida, the city of Andrew and Peter. Philip found Nathanael, and he said to him, “We have found him of whom Moses in the law and also the prophets wrote, Jesus of Nazareth, the son of Joseph.” Nathanael said to him, “Can anything good come out of Nazareth?” Philip said to him, “Come and see.” Jesus saw Nathanael coming to him, and said of him, “Behold, an Israelite indeed, in whom is no guile!” Nathanael said to him, “How do you know me?” Jesus answered him, “Before Philip called you, when you were under the fig tree, I saw you.” Nathanael answered him, “Rabbi, you are the son of God! You are the King of Israel!” Jesus answered him, “Because I said to you, I saw you under the fig tree, do you believe? You shall see greater things than these.” And he said to him, “Truly, truly, I say to you, you will see heaven opened, and the angels of God ascending and descending upon the Son of man.”

Announcements – Sunday of Orthodoxy

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Family Night – Language and Culture March 25th presentation

Please join us on Friday, March 22nd following the Salutations to the Theotokos. Join us in the community center for a Lenten meal followed by a presentation from the Language and culture classes and a special guest, our “Ierokyrix”, V. Rev. Fr. Christodoulos Papadeas from the Metropolis of Atlanta.

Choir

We are looking for faithful members to give their time, talent and voices to join our choir, under the leadership of Patricia Zeiler, to give praise and honor in song to our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. You do not have to have a perfect voice—All you need is a love for Christ and a desire to honor Him with all you heart, mind and voice. Please contact the church office at 954-467-1515.

Save the Date

Nia Vardalos is coming to St. Demetrios for an exclusive book signing. Visit our website for additional information.

Daughters of Penelope Scholarships

Two scholarships are being offered by the Daughters of Penelope from District #2 and the Nationals. Please contact Mary Carratt for more details at 954-491-0821. The deadline for the District is May 1st.

AHEPA National Scholarship Application – MARCH 31 Deadline

Scholarship Application

AHEPA District #2 Scholarship Application

Three Hierarchs Scholarship (THS) Award

Application forms for the THS awards of Drs. Anthony and Joyce Kales are available in the Church office. These scholarships are awarded strictly on the basis of meritorious academic achievement for college bound seniors. The academic guidelines for consideration include:
Placement in the top 10% of one’s class; membership in the National Honor Society; and a combined SAT Verbal and Math score of 1280 or greater (1300 or greater if the high school does not have a ranking system or membership in the National Honors Society).
Deadline for submission of application is June 15.

NEW YORK – Scholarships

Applications and instructions for the three scholarships administered by the Chancellor’s Office of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America, are now available for awards to be made for the 2013-2014 academic year. Two of these scholarships are for undergraduate studies: the George & Naouma (Gioule) Gioles Scholarship and the Katina John Malta Scholarship; the third one is the Paleologos Graduate Scholarship, which is awarded for graduate work of a non-theological nature. Each of these scholarships was established through generous gifts from dedicated Greek Orthodox Christians who wanted to provide financial assistance towards the education of young people from our Orthodox community.

The deadline for applying for all three is April 26, 2013. Further details, including complete instructions and applications, are available on-line on the website of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America and may also be requested by e-mail at scholarships@goarch.org, or by written request to the Scholarship Committee, Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America, 8-10 East 79th Street, New York, NY, 10075.

Office of Ionian Village

Two summer camping sessions for Greek Orthodox Youth who have completed grades 8 through 12. are being offered this year
Summer Travel Camp: June 23– July 12, 2013.
Byzantine Venture: July 20—August 8, 2013.

Spiritual Odyssey “ Cypress and Crete: May 30– June 9, 2013 For young adults ages 19 to 28

Please contact the Office of Ionian Village at ionianvillage@goarch.org or call 212-570-3536.

St. Stephen’s Summer Camp 2013 is approaching!

Applications are now being accepted online for our five week summer camp program. Returning and new counselors must complete online application. Registration for campers will be opening March 1st.

Weekly Sunday Bulletin – Forgiveness Sunday (Cheesefare)

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Forgiveness Sunday

O Master, Prudence, Guide of Wisdom, Instruction to the foolish and Defender of the poor, strengthen my heart and grant it discernment. Give me words, Word of the Father, for behold, I shall not keep my lips from crying out to You, “O Merciful One, have mercy on me who has fallen.”

 

Parish Council on duty:

Peter Angelakos, John Argiropoulos, Anna Merkel, Medon Michaelides, Chris Nichols, Peter Synoyannis, Eleni Varvoutis

Liturgical – Forgiveness Sunday (Cheesefare)

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Apolytikion Ήχος Πλ. Δ – 8th

Εξ ύψους κατήλθες…
From on high did You descend O merciful Lord. For us did You endure three days in the tomb. That we may be, released from passions in this world. You who are our resurrection and our life, glory unto you O Lord!

Apolytikion of St. Demetrios

Μέγαν εύρατο έν τοίς κινδύνοις…
The world found in you a great champion in dangers a victor who could turn the nations back! As you restrained Levi in the arena, you also inspired Nestor to courage! Therefore, holy, great martyr, Demetrios, entreat Christ God to grant us great mercy!

Kontakion

Της σοφίας οδηγέ
O Master, Prudence, Guide of Wisdom, Instruction to the foolish and Defender of the poor, strengthen my heart and grant it discernment. Give me words, Word of the father, for behold, I shall not keep my lips from crying out to You, “O Merciful One, have mercy on me who have fallen.”

 

Trisagia

Maria Duddleston survived by her husband Frank and niece Anastasia Arvanitis

Elias Tzaneteas reposed in Toronto , survived by his son George, daughter-in- law Dimitra and grandsons Elliot and Paul

Constantin Voicu reposed in Romania, survived by his son Mihai, daughter-in-law Ana and granddaughter Michelle

Mary Anastasiou (1yr) survived by her son Tom, daughter-in-law Ellen and family

Dr. George Mehallis (7yrs) survived by his wife Dr. Mantha Mehallis, son Spero and his wife Rocio and brother Stephen  Mehallis and family

James Truman (10yrs)survived by his wife Helen and children Peter, Kathy, Alison and Nicholas

Gerald Hyland (17yrs) survived by his wife Antonia Hyland, daughters Rena Shahan and Elizabeth Hyland and 3 grandchildren

Cheesefare Sunday (Matthew 6:14-21)

The theme of this Sunday refers to the expulsion of Adam from Paradise. Adam in Paradise misused his freedom by allowing himself to be persuaded by the evil one to disobey the command to not eat of the fruit of the tree of knowledge of good and evil. The evil one convinced him that by so doing he would know more than God. The Church in its hymnology presents the condition of Adam outside of Paradise as weeping and working hard for his livelihood. The Gospel passage of the day refers to the manner of praying, fasting, almsgiving and all good works. These are to be done in secret, without boasting. The meaning of this Sunday is the condescension of God to the human weakness, “for if you forgive men their trespasses, your heavenly Father also will forgive you; but if you do not forgive men their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses” (v. 14-15). This is emphasized in the Lord’s Prayer.,The week (six days) preceding Sunday of Cheese and after Meat Sunday, is the addition to the period of the Great Lent which completes the forty days of fasting (excluding Saturdays and Sundays). The name of this Sunday, “Cheese”, implies that the fast of this week is the gradual transition from eating meat to the strict fast of Lent, which starts the next day, Monday, with the first Sunday of Lent at the end of the preliminary seven days (Sunday of Orthodoxy).

The Significance of Great Lent

Great Lent before Easter is when the Christian participates fully in preparing himself to praise and glorify his God as Lord and Savior. Great Lent is like a “workshop” where the character of the faithful is spiritually uplifted and strengthened; where his life is rededicated to the principles and ideals of the Gospel; where the faith culminates in deep conviction of life; where apathy and disinterest turn into vigorous activities of faith and good works. Lent is not for the sake of Lent itself, as fasting is not for the sake of fasting. But they are means by which and for which the individual believer prepares himself to reach for, accept and attain the calling of his Savior. Therefore, the significance of Great Lent is highly appraised, not only by the monks who gradually increased the length of time of the Lent, but also by the lay people themselves, although they do not observe the full length of time. As such, Great Lent is the sacred Institute of the Church to serve the individual believer in participating as a member of the Mystical Body of Christ, and, from time to time, to improve the standards of faith and morals in his Christian life. The deep intent of the believer during the Great Lent is “forgetting what lies behind and straining forward to what lies ahead, I press on toward the goal of the prize of the upward call of God in Christ Jesus”, Philippians 3:13-14.

On Fasting

The value of fasting consists not in abstinence only from food, but in a relinquishment of sinful practices, since he who limits his fasting only to an abstinence from meat is he who especially disparages it. Do you fast? Give me proof of it by your works. If you see a poor man, take pity on him! If you see a friend enjoying honor, do not envy him. For let not the mouth only fast, but also the eye, and the ear, and the feet, and the hands and all the members  of our bodies. Let the hands fast by being pure from avarice. Let the feet fast by ceasing from running to forbidden spectacles. Let the eyes fast by being taught  never to fix themselves rudely upon handsome countenances. For looking is the food of the eyes, but if it be unlawful or forbidden it mars the fast and overturns the safety of the soul; but if it be lawful and safe, it adorns fasting. For it would be an instance of the highest absurdity to abstain from meats and from unlawful food because of the fast, but with the eyes to feed on what is forbidden. Do you not eat flesh? Do not feed on licentiousness by means of the eyes. Let the ear fast also. The fasting of the ear is not to receive evil speaking and calumnies. “You shall not receive an idle report,” it says. Let also the mouth fast from foul words. For what does it profit if we abstain from birds and flesh and yet bite and devour our brethren?

St. John Chrysostom, Lenten Homily

Scripture Readings

Epistle Reading

St. Paul’s Letter to the Romans 13:11-14; 14:1-4

Brethren, salvation is nearer to us now than when we first believed; the night is far gone, the day is at hand.  Let us then cast off the works of darkness and put on the armor of light; let us conduct ourselves becomingly as in the day, not in reveling and drunkenness, not in debauchery and licentiousness, not in quarreling and jealousy.  But put on the Lord Jesus Christ, and make no provision for the flesh, to gratify its desires.
 As for the man who is weak in faith, welcome him, but not for disputes over opinions.  One believes he may eat anything, while the weak man eats only vegetables.  Let not him who eats despise him who abstains, and let not him who abstains pass judgment on him who eats; for God has welcomed him.  Who are you to pass judgment on the servant of another?  It is before his own master that he stands or falls.  And he will be upheld, for God is able to make him stand.

Gospel Reading

Matthew 6:14-21
Forgiveness Sunday (Cheesefare)

The Lord said, “If you forgive men their trespasses, your heavenly Father also will forgive you; but if you do not forgive men their trespasses, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses.
“And when you fast, do not look dismal, like the hypocrites, for they disfigure their faces that their fasting may be seen by men.  Truly, I say to you, they have received their reward.  But when you fast, anoint your head and wash your face, that your fasting may not be seen by men but by your Father who is in secret; and your Father who sees in secret will reward you.
“Do not lay up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust consume and where thieves break in and steal, but lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust consumes and where thieves do not break in and steal.  For where your treasure is, there will your heart be also.”

Liturgical – Judgement Sunday (Meatfare)

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Apolytikion Ήχος Βαρίς – 7th

Κατέλυσας τώ Σταυρώ σου…
O Lord by Your sacred Cross You abolished death, and granted unto the thief blessed paradise. The Myrrh bearers ceased lamenting and turned to joy. The apostles did preach the Good News at Your command, that You had risen from the dead O Christ Our God, bestowing Your mercy upon the world evermore.

Apolytikion of St. Demetrios

Μέγαν εύρατο έν τοίς κινδύνοις…
The world found in you a great champion in dangers a victor who could turn the nations back! As you restrained Levi in the arena, you also inspired Nestor to courage! Therefore, holy, great martyr, Demetrios, entreat Christ God to grant us great mercy!

Kontakion

Όταν έλθης ο Θεός…
O God, when You come upon the earth in glory, the whole world will tremble. A river of fire will bring all before Your Judgment Seat and the books will be opened, and everything in secret will become public. At that time, deliver me from the fire which never dies, and enable me to stand by Your right hand, O Judge most Just.

 

Memorial

Alexander Paraskis (40days) survived by Alexandra and George Nichols and grandchildren Tassia and Mark Brunt and Christopher and Raffaella Nichols and great grandchildren Natalia, Konstantinos, Maximos and Mason.

Trisagia

Mike Monezis (8yrs) beloved husband and father of Betty and Mona Monezis

Meatfare Sunday

Today is called “Meat-Fare” because during the week following it a limited fasting-abstention from meat is prescribed by the Church. This prescription is to be understood in the light of what has been said above the meaning preparation. The Church begins now to “adjust” us to the great effort which she will expect from us seven days later. She gradually takes us into that effort-knowing our frailty, foreseeing our spiritual weakness.

On the eve of that day (Meat-Fare Saturday), the Church invites us to a universal commemoration of all those who have “fallen asleep in the hope of resurrection and life eternal.” This is indeed the Church’s great day of prayer for her departed members. To understand the meaning of this connection between Lent and the prayer for the dead, one must remember that Christianity is the religion of love. Christ left with his disciples not a doctrine of individual salvation but a new commandment “that they love one another,” and He added: “By this shall all know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.” Love is thus the foundation, the very life of the Church which is, in the words of St. Ignatius of Antioch, the “unity of faith and love.” Sin is always absence of love, and therefore separation, isolation, war of all against all. The new life given by Christ and conveyed to us by the Church is, first of all , a life of reconciliation, of “gathering into oneness of those who were dispersed,” the restoration of love broken by sin. But how can we begin our return to God and our reconciliation with Him if in ourselves we do not return to the unique new commandment of love? Praying for the dead is an essential expression of the Church as love. We ask God to remember those whom we remember and we remember them because we love them. Praying for them we meet them in Christ who is Love and who, because He is Love, overcomes death which is the ultimate victory of separation and lovelessness. In Christ there is no difference between living and dead because all are alive in Him. He is the Life and that Life is the light of man. Loving Christ, we love all those who are in Him; loving those who are in Him, we love Christ: this is the law of the Church and the obvious rationale for her of prayer for the dead. It is truly our love in Christ that keeps them alive because it keeps them “in Christ” and how wrong, how hopelessly wrong for the dead to a juridical doctrine of “merits” and “compensation” or simply reject it as useless. The great Vigil for the Dead of Meatfare Saturday serves as a pattern for all other commemorations of the departed and it is repeated on the second, third and fourth Saturdays of Lent.
(if you want more… please read GREAT LENT- Journey to Pascha by Alexander Schmemann.)

Scripture Readings

Epistle Reading

St. Paul’s First Letter to the Corinthians 8:8-13; 9:1-2

Brethren, food will not commend us to God. We are no worse off if we do not eat, and no better off if we do. Only take care lest this liberty of yours somehow become a stumbling block to the weak. For if any one sees you, a man of knowledge, at table in an idol’s temple, might he not be encouraged, if his conscience is weak, to eat food offered to idols? And so by your knowledge this weak man is destroyed, the brother for whom Christ died. Thus, sinning against your brethren and wounding their conscience when it is weak, you sin against Christ. Therefore, if food is a cause of my brother’s falling, I will never eat meat, lest I cause my brother to fall.
Am I not free? Am I not an apostle? Have I not seen Jesus our Lord? Are not you my workmanship in the Lord? If to others I am not an apostle, at least I am to you; for you are the seal of my apostleship in the Lord.

Gospel Reading

Matthew 25:31-46
Judgment Sunday (Meatfare Sunday)

The Lord said, “When the Son of man comes in his glory and all the holy angels with him, then he will sit on his glorious throne. Before him will be gathered all the nations, and he will separate them one from another as a shepherd separates the sheep from the goats, and he will place the sheep at his right hand, but the goats at the left. Then the king will say to those at his right hand, ‘Come, O blessed of my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world; for I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me drink, I was a stranger and you welcomed me, I was naked and you clothed me, I was sick and you visited me, I was in prison and you came to me.’ Then the righteous will answer him, ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry and feed you, or thirsty and give you drink? And when did we see you a stranger and welcome you, or naked and clothe you? And when did we see you sick or in prison and visit you?’ And the King will answer them, ‘Truly, I say to you, as you did it to one of the least of these my brethren, you did it to me.’ Then he will say to those at his left hand, ‘Depart from me, you cursed, into the eternal fire prepared for the devil and his angels; for I was hungry and you gave me no food, I was thirsty and you gave me no drink, I was a stranger and you did not welcome me, naked and you did not clothe me, sick and in prison and you did not visit me.’ Then they also will answer, ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry or thirsty or a stranger or naked or sick or in prison, and did not minister to you?’ Then he will answer them, ‘Truly, I say to you, as you did it not to one of the least of these, you did it not to me.’ And they will go away into eternal punishment, but the righteous into eternal life.”