Posts

The Liturgical Guide and Bulletin for Sunday, February 28th, 2021

 


 

February 28, 2021~ Sunday of the Prodigal Son~ 

 

 

Sunday of the Prodigal Son

 

Through the parable of today’s Gospel, our Saviour has set forth three things for us: the condition of the sinner, the rule of repentance, and the greatness of God’s compassion. The divine Fathers have put this reading the week after the parable of the Publican and Pharisee so that, seeing in the person of the Prodigal Son our own wretched condition — inasmuch as we are sunken in sin, far from God and His Mysteries — we might at last come to our senses and make haste to return to Him by repentance during these holy days of the Fast.

Furthermore, those who have wrought many great iniquities, and have persisted in them for a long time, oftentimes fall into despair, thinking that there can no longer be any forgiveness for them; and so being without hope, they fall every day into the same and even worse iniquities. Therefore, the divine Fathers, that they might root out the passion of despair from the hearts of such people, and rouse them to the deeds of virtue, have set the present parable at the forecourts of the Fast, to show them the surpassing goodness of God’s compassion, and to teach them that there is no sin — no matter how great it may be — that can overcome at any time His love for man.

 


 

Liturgical Guide

 

Resurrectional Apolytikion in the Plagal First Mode
Τν συνναρχον Λγον Πατρ κα Πνεματι…
Let us worship the Word, O ye faithful, praising Him that with the Father and the Spirit is co-beginningless God, Who was born of a pure Virgin that we all be saved; for He was pleased to mount the Cross in the flesh that He assumed, accepting thus to endure death. And by His glorious rising, He also willed to resurrect the dead.

Apolytikion of St. Demetrios in the Third Mode
Μέγαν εύρατο εv τοίς κιvδύvοις …
Greatness has been found in danger.  You are champion of the world.  A victor who could turn the nations back.  You boldly encouraged Nestor to defeat Lyaeus in the arena.  Therefore, holy great martyr Demetrios, intercede with Christ our God, to grant us His great mercy.

Seasonal Kontakion in the Third Mode 
Τς πατρας, δξης σου…
O Father, foolishly I ran away from Your glory, and in sin, squandered the riches You gave me. Wherefore, I cry out to You with the voice of the Prodigal, “I have sinned before You Compassionate Father. Receive me in repentance and take me as one of Your hired servants.”

Prokeimenon. Plagal First Mode. Psalm 11.7,1. 
You, O Lord, shall keep us and preserve us.
Verse: Save me, O Lord, for the godly man has failed.

The reading is from St. Paul’s First Letter to the Corinthians 6:12-20

Brethren, “all things are lawful for me,” but not all things are helpful. “All things are lawful for me,” but I will not be enslaved by anything. “Food is meant for the stomach and the stomach for food” — and God will destroy both one and the other. The body is not meant for immorality, but for the Lord, and the Lord for the body. And God raised the Lord and will also raise us up by his power. Do you not know that your bodies are members of Christ? Shall I therefore take the members of Christ and make them members of a prostitute? Never! Do you not know that he who joins himself to a prostitute becomes one body with her? For, as it is written, “The two shall become one flesh.” But he who is united to the Lord becomes one spirit with him. Shun immorality. Every other sin which a man commits is outside the body; but the immoral man sins against his own body. Do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit within you, which you have from God? You are not your own; you were bought with a price. So glorify God in your body and in your spirit which belong to God.
The Reading is from Luke 15:11-32

The Lord said this parable: “There was a man who had two sons; and the younger of them said to his father, ‘Father, give me the share of the property that falls to me.’ And he divided his living between them. Not many days later, the younger son gathered all he had and took his journey into a far country, and there he squandered his property in loose living. And when he had spent everything, a great famine arose in that country, and he began to be in want. So he went and joined himself to one of the citizens of that country, who sent him into his fields to feed swine. And he would gladly have filled his belly with the pods that the swine ate; and no one gave him anything. But when he came to himself he said, ‘How many of my father’s hired servants have bread enough and to spare, but I perish here with hunger! I will arise and go to my father, and I will say to him, ‘Father, I have sinned against heaven and before you; I am no longer worthy to be called your son; treat me as one of your hired servants.’ And he arose and came to his father. But while he was yet at a distance, his father saw him and had compassion, and ran and embraced him and kissed him. And the son said to him, ‘Father, I have sinned against heaven and before you; I am no longer worthy to be called your son.’ But the father said to his servants, ‘Bring quickly the best robe, and put it on him; and put a ring on his hand, and shoes on his feet; and bring the fatted calf and kill it, and let us eat and make merry; for this my son was dead, and is alive again; he was lost, and is found.’ And they began to make merry. Now his elder son was in the field; and as he came and drew near to the house, he heard music and dancing. And he called one of the servants and asked what this meant. And he said to him, ‘Your brother has come, and your father has killed the fatted calf, because he has received him safe and sound.’ But he was angry and refused to go in. His father came out and entreated him, but he answered his father, ‘Lo, these many years I have served you, and I never disobeyed your command; yet you never gave me a kid, that I might make merry with my friends. But when this son of yours came, who has devoured your living with harlots, you killed for him the fatted calf!’ And he said to him, ‘Son, you are always with me, and all that is mine is yours. It was fitting to make merry and be glad, for this your brother was dead, and is alive; he was lost, and is found.'”


 

Memorial Prayer

Maria Papastamatis (6 months) survived by her husband George, sons Michael and Alexander (Maria), and granddaughter Christina.

Trisagion Prayer

Symeon Stewart (40 days) remembered by his friend Dimitra.

Patricia G. Makris (25 yrs), Constantine G. Makris (27 yrs), Irene W. Georgitson 30 yrs), survived by Barbara, Katina, and Jacob C. Hollander.

 


 

Schedule of Church Services

  • 2/28  Sunday:                                                         9am/10am          Orthros/Divine Liturgy
  • 3/6    Saturday of Souls:                                     9am/10am          Orthros/Divine Liturgy

 

Also, we are live streaming our services.

Visit https://stdemetrios.org/ where a link to the broadcast will be found.

 


 

Announcements

 

Parish Council News

This Sunday, February 28, the Parish Council will be sworn in for the new year.  We thank them for their service to our community.

Dr. George Georgakakis-President
Harry Tangalakis-Vice President
Garry Paxinos-Treasurer
Bill Ypsilantis-Assistant Treasurer
Karyl Zitis-Secretary
Marion Koliniatis-Assistant Secretary
Mona Monezis Kapakos
Larry Kirifides
Peter Kokkinos
Anna Nicholas
Philip Vias
Mark Zaden
Kathy Ziegler

 


 

Mental Health Resources

Late last year, the Assembly of Bishops assembled a Mental Health Task Force to assist our Churches in this very important ministry to the faithful. I am therefore very pleased to announce that, as the result of the work of the Task Force, a National Directory of Orthodox Mental Health providers has been created. Visit  https://www.assemblyofbishops.org/directories/mental-health/ .

I join my fellow Hierarchs in thanking the Steering Committee of the Mental Health Task Force, and all those Orthodox Professionals who participated in the creation of this directory, so that it might help the greatest number of individuals.

Praying for the continued health of all, both in body and soul, I remain,

Paternally yours with love in Christ,

+ A L E X I O S
Metropolitan of Atlanta

 


 

Saturdays of Souls

The Saturdays of Souls are March 6, March 13, and March 20.  Matins will start at 9:00am with Divine Liturgy following at 10:00am. You may reply to this email to list the names of your beloved who have fallen asleep in the Lord.  In order for them to be included, we must have the names by Wednesday prior to the Saturday Service.

 


 

Stewardship

“…The Greatest Of These Is Love” 1 Cor 13:13

 

We ask you to support the worship, service and activities of St. Demetrios Church. Giving to His Church is a way to thank God for His grace, His generosity and His many blessings. Let’s Step Up our gifts of Time Talent and Treasure!

Please fill out a pledge form by either visiting https://stdemetrios.org/our-parish/stewardship/stewardship-form/ or downloading this form.  You can make contributions towards your financial pledge by visiting https://stdemetrios.org/make-a-donation/ .

Thank you!

 


 

St. Demetrios Festival Replacement 

 

Dear Parishioners and Friends of St. Demetrios Church

Our annual Greek Festival has unfortunately been canceled this year.  The Parish Council and Father Peter came to this decision after a lot of debate.

Prior to making this decision we actually did study what many other communities had done this past summer and fall as alternatives to their traditional festivals.  Most put on a drive through food only festival.  Our festival planning committee actually met 3 times this fall to begin planning just such an event.  Unfortunately, we discovered that there will be ongoing construction on the sewer system in front of the church through the summer of 2021.

Each year our community counts on the Greek Festival to raise the $95,000 necessary to balance our budget and continue the ministry of Saint Demetrios.  Our community cannot survive without these funds.  Borrowing money for operating expenses is out of the question. The Parish Council and Father Peter therefore came up with the following strategy to procure the necessary monies.
Drs. Joyce and Anthony Kales and Dr. George Georgakakis would each donate $10,000.  In addition, the community would use a portion of it’s annual gift from the William and Bridget Eaton Partalis Family Trust.  We would also ask 10 parishioners to support what we are calling the “Saint Demetrios Festival Replacement Fund” with individual donations of $1,000.  The remaining estimated $40,000 would hopefully be raised by asking each of our 260 parishioners to consider contributing $160 to the Festival Replacement Fund.  This would get us to our goal of $95,000

At our Winter General Assembly meeting last month we actually had 11 parishioners step up and offer to be $1000 donors.  Since that time we have been blessed with several more such donors.

We now humbly ask all of our Saint Demetrios family to please consider coming to the aid of our parish in this time of great need.  Your gift of $160 will help ensure that our church survives this upcoming year in spite of all the unknowns associated with the ongoing Covid-19 crisis.  Your gift ensures that Saint Demetrios will remain a healthy and vibrant Christian community when the world returns to normalcy.  Please help Saint Demetrios continue its vitally important ministry.

Thank you!
You may mail a check to: (make sure to note Festival Replacement in the memo)

St. Demetrios Church
820 NE 14 Ave.
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33304

Or, visit   https://stdemetrios.org/make-a-donation/ , choose General Donation from the drop down menu and note “Festival Replacement” in the comment section.

 


 

Sunday School News

  • Oratorical Festival

The St. Demetrios Oratorical Festival is set for Sunday, March 21. The event will take place after liturgy in the church. To learn more, students and parents may contact James W. Carras at jameswcarras@gmail.com. Below are the topics. Visit https://www.goarch.org/en/oratorical for tips and resources on the topics, the rules, the various scholarship opportunities, and the Metropolis level and Archdiocese level dates.

Junior Division (Grades 7–9) Topics

1. Discuss the challenges and opportunities of watching a church service that is live streamed.
2. Prayer is called a “conversation with God.” Discuss the meaning of prayer in your life.
3. During the pandemic, people noticed that our natural environment became cleaner. What can this teach us about our care for the natural world?
4. Why is the Church still relevant, especially for young people, in our increasingly secular, post-COVID world?
5. Choose one parable from the Gospel of Luke chapters 15 or 16 that is particularly meaningful to you and explain what we can learn from it.

Senior Division (Grades 10–12) Topics

1. During the stay at home period of the pandemic, Orthodox Christians had to find ways to practice their faith without attending church in person or participating in parish activities. Discuss what you learned during those days.
2. In July 2020, a Turkish court gave permission for Hagia Sophia to be converted from a museum into a mosque. Discuss the significance of Hagia Sophia in the history of Christianity and the power of monuments like it to inspire religious identity.
3. We live in a highly polarized society – left vs. right, personal liberty vs. common good, and other issues where it seems everything is politicized. How are we as Orthodox Christians called to navigate this environment?
4. St. Peter writes, “Live as free men, yet without using your freedom as a pretext for evil; but live as servants of God.” (1 Peter 2:16). What is freedom and how does it become a basis for being a servant?
5. In the Psalms we read, “If you, Lord, should mark iniquities, Lord, who could stand? But there is forgiveness with you.” (Psalm 130:3-4, NRSV). Discuss how an Orthodox Christian understands sin, forgiveness, mercy, and repentance.

 


 

Scholarship News

Applications for the Dr. Helene Tzitsikas Scholarship  for students enrolled in higher education as well as applications for St. Stephen’s Summer Camp are open.  More information about the Dr. Tzitsikas Scholarship can be found on the St. Demetrios website www.stdemetrios.org.  Information about St. Stephen’s Camp can be found on their website St. Stephen’s Summer Camp – Greek Orthodox Metropolis of Atlanta – Atlanta, GA (atlmetropolis.org)
Scholarship applications are available on line at the St. Demetrios website or call the Church Office 954-467-1515 Monday – Thursday.  Deadlines for all applications are May 1, 2021.

 


 

Philoptochos News

 

  • Metropolis Philoptochos Spiritual Retreat

The annual Metropolis Philoptochos Spiritual Retreat will be virtual this year, so we can engage with popular Orthodox author Federica Matthews-Greene and have fellowship with other women from across the Metropolis without the long trek to the Diakonia Center,

All women are invited.  See the flyer attached and click here to register  https://atlmetropolis.org/virtual-spiritual-retreat-2021

Matthews-Greene has written 10 books on the Greek Orthodox faith, and is Khouria/Presvytera at Holy Cross Antiochian Church in Baltimore.

 

  • Membership          

Dear Ladies of St. Demetrios,
This has been a year like none other.  Many of us and our loved ones have faced illness, unemployment, and loneliness.  And yet the women of St. Demetrios have reached out to fill our spiritual, material, and emotional needs. It was women, through the Ladies Philoptochos, St. Elpis (Hope) chapter, who called to check on parishioners, got food and money to families who were suddenly unemployed, called and sent cards to the sick, reached out to our young people, and donated to the needs of greater Ft. Lauderdale.
But our patron St. Elpis wasn’t alone.  She was the daughter of Sophia (Wisdom) and the sister of Pistis (Faith) and Agape (Love).  To continue its work, Philoptochos needs ALL the wisdom, hope, faith, and love of ALL the women of St. Demetrios.
Please use the form below to join or renew for 2021.

 

  • National Philoptochos Department of Social Services


 

Daughters of Penelope News

 

  • Food Drive The Daughters of Penelope are having an Easter Food Drive Drive starting Sunday, February 28th thru March 28th. Non perishable items, grocery store gift cards or monetary donations will be greatly appreciated.

 

  • Membership Drive We would love to have you join our wonderful Chapter!!  Our next initiation will be in January 2021.  Please contact Erin Ryan at 954 683-6452 or eryan75@gmail.com.
     
  • Virtual Bingo

 


 

AHEPA News

  • Comedy Night


 

Creative Expression and Research Contest



Light a Candle & Say a Prayer at Saint Demetrios

 

“It is impossible to imagine an Orthodox church in which candles are not lit.”
(Blessed Simeon of Thessalonica, 15th Century) 

“I am the light of the world; he who follows me will not walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.” (John 8:12) 

We know that at this time it can be difficult to pray from home and not physically be in the church. One of the first things most people do upon entering an Orthodox Church is to light their candle and offer prayers for one’s personal needs or that of a family member or friend, we also light candles to pray for protection and safety so that we may live this life without fear.

If you wish to light a candle, visit https://saintdemetrios.square.site After you select the candle(s) that you would like us to light and before pressing the “Place Order” button, please submit the names of your loved ones, those who are alive and/or those who have departed this life. During these times we would be happy to light the candle for you and read the names that have been submitted during the Divine Liturgy.

 


 

Dear St. Demetrios Family,

St. Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church, Ft. Lauderdale is open to the faithful.  We are complying with all CDC, State, Local and Archdiocese guidelines.  Here is the list of things that will be taking place on Sundays.

1)  Everyone must wear a mask in order to enter the church.
2)  Before entering the church, the temperature of each person will be taken by a designated person. If the person’s temperature is above 100.4 F he or she will be kindly asked to return to their home, both for their safety and the safety of others.
3) Parish Council will direct each parishioner to the designated X in the pews for each person or household to sit starting in the front of the church and working their way to back.
4) A place to accept offerings will be provided in the Narthex upon entering or leaving.
5) Parishioners are not to move around the church during the services to light candles or venerate icons.
6) Names and phone numbers of each attendee at every service will be taken in the event that a subsequent infection requires tracing.
7) If you have any symptoms of coronavirus, COVID-19 (fever, cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, chills, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat, new loss of taste or smell), you must NOT attend church, and immediately seek medical attention for yourself and your household.
8) Parishioners who are at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19 as defined by civil authorities are given dispensation not to attend services and will be asked to refrain from attending.
9) In terms of preventing the spread of this virus, we ask parishioners to follow CDC directives, which currently include: washing of hands thoroughly and frequently, covering your coughs and sneezes, avoiding sharing personal items, wearing a mask, and maintaining a social distance of six feet.
10) Honor is to be shown to Holy Icons and the Holy Cross by only doing your cross and bowing, keeping in mind not to kiss or to touch the Holy Icons and the Holy Cross.
11) No one is to enter the Holy Altar except the clergy and assigned adult helpers.
12) For Memorials, please write the names of your deceased for the clergy to pray for their souls (without Koliva).
13) Artoclasias will be celebrated as normal.
14) No service books will be left out for common use. This includes papers of any kind (bulletins etc.). Parishioners are encouraged to bring their own service books.
15) During Holy Communion – Communicants must line up row by row (with help from Parish Council) and remain six feet apart using the designated social distancing X’s that have been placed in the church.  Communicants may remove their masks only momentarily to receive Holy Communion.
16)  For the continued safety of those attending church services in person, parishioners should immediately leave when the service is finished. For the sake of others, please do not socialize in the Narthex or other areas of the church or its surrounding buildings or parking lots. Additionally, Sunday Coffee Fellowship hours will be suspended until further notice.

Yours In Christ,
Fr. Peter Zougras

 

The Liturgical Guide and Bulletin for Sunday, February 21st, 2021

 


 

February 21, 2021 ~ Sunday of the Publican and Pharisee ~ Triodion Begins

 

 

Sunday of the Publican and Pharisee

 

The Pharisees were an ancient and outstanding sect among the Jews known for their diligent observance of the outward matters of the Law. Although, according to the word of our Lord, they “did all their works to be seen of men” (Matt. 23:5), and were hypocrites (ibid. 23: 13, 14, 15, etc.), because of the apparent holiness of their lives they were thought by all to be righteous, and separate from others, which is what the name Pharisee means. On the other hand, Publicans, collectors of the royal taxes, committed many injustices and extortions for filthy lucre’s sake, and all held them to be sinners and unjust. It was therefore according to common opinion that the Lord Jesus in His parable signified a virtuous person by a Pharisee, and a sinner by a Publican, to teach His disciples the harm of pride and the profit of humble-mindedness.

Since the chief weapon for virtue is humility, and the greatest hindrance to it is pride, the divine Fathers have set these three weeks before the Forty-day Fast as a preparation for the spiritual struggles of virtue. This present week they have called Harbinger, since it declares that the Fast is approaching; and they set humility as the foundation for all our spiritual labors by appointing that the parable of the Publican and the Pharisee be read today, even before the Fast begins, to teach, through the vaunting of the Pharisee, that the foul smoke of self-esteem and the stench of boasting drives away the grace of the Spirit, strips man of all his virtue, and casts him into the pits of Hades; and, through the repentance and contrite prayer of the Publican, that humility confers upon the sinner forgiveness of all his wicked deeds and raises him up to the greatest heights.

 

 

Eustathius, Bishop of Antioch
Commemorated on February 21

 

Saint Eustathius, the great defender of piety and illustrious opponent of Arianism, was from Side in Pamphylia. He became Bishop of Beroea (the present-day Aleppo), and in 325 was present at the First Ecumenical Council. From thence he was transferred to the throne of Antioch. But Saint Constantine the Great, led astray by the slanders directed against the Saint by the Arians, banished him to Trajanopolis in Thrace, where he reposed in 337, according to some. Others say he lived until 360.

 


 

Liturgical Guide

 

Resurrectional Apolytikion in the Fourth Mode
Τ φαιδρν τς ναστσεως κρυγμα…
Having learned the joyful proclamation of the Resurrection from the Angel, and having cast off the ancestral condemnation, the women disciples of the Lord spake to the Apostles exultantly: Death is despoiled and Christ God is risen, granting great mercy to the world.

Apolytikion of St. Demetrios in the Third Mode
Μέγαν εύρατο εv τοίς κιvδύvοις …
Greatness has been found in danger.  You are champion of the world.  A victor who could turn the nations back.  You boldly encouraged Nestor to defeat Lyaeus in the arena.  Therefore, holy great martyr Demetrios, intercede with Christ our God, to grant us His great mercy.

Seasonal Kontakion in the Fourth Mode 
Φαρισαου φγωμεν ψηγοραν…
Let us flee from the boasting of the Pharisee and learn through our own sighs of sorrow the humility of the Publican. Let us cry out to the Savior, “Have mercy on us, for through You alone are we reconciled.”

Prokeimenon. Fourth Mode. Psalm 103.24,1. 
O Lord, how manifold are your works. You have made all things in wisdom.
Verse: Bless the Lord, O my soul.

 

The reading is from St. Paul’s Second Letter to the Timothy 3:10-15

TIMOTHY, my son, you have observed my teaching, my conduct, my aim in life, my faith, my patience, my love, my steadfastness, my persecutions, my sufferings, what befell me at Antioch, at lconion, and at Lystra, what persecutions I endured; yet from them all the Lord rescued me. Indeed all who desire to live a godly life in Christ Jesus will be persecuted, while evil men and impostors will go on from bad to worse, deceivers and deceived. But as for you, continue in what you have learned and have firmly believed, knowing from whom you learned it and how from childhood you have been acquainted with the sacred writings which are able to instruct you for salvation through faith in Christ Jesus.
The Reading is from Luke 18:10-14

The Lord said this parable, “Two men went up into the temple to pray, one a Pharisee and the other a tax collector. The Pharisee stood and prayed thus with himself, ‘God, I thank you that I am not like other men, extortioners, unjust, adulterers, or even like this tax collector. I fast twice a week, I give tithes of all that I get.’ But the tax collector, standing far off, would not even lift up his eyes to heaven, but beat his breast, saying, ‘God, be merciful to me a sinner!’ I tell you, this man went down to his house justified rather than the other; for everyone who exalts himself will be humbled, but he who humbles himself will be exalted.”

 


 

Memorial Prayer

 

Gari Paticopoulos (40 days) survived by her children Marie Paticopoulos Needham and Margret Poole, 4 grandchildren, and 1 great grandson.

Elpitha Markides Zapantis (40 days) aunt of Elias Zapantis and family.

Neophytos Demetriou (1 year) survived by his children and grandchildren.

Michael Homatas (1 year) survived by his wife Stacy and the Homatas, Nesi, and Prevolis families.

Louis Elias Salas (1 year) survived by his wife Sandra Louise, daughter Keen Ann, grandchildren, aunt Sophia Thermis, nieces and nephews.

Peter James Thermis (2 years) survived by his sister Sophia Thermis, nieces and nephews.

Sophia Pacani (10 years) survived by her parents Anan and Petros and by her siblings Thanassi, Dhimitri, and Gabriella Sofia.

 

Trisagion Prayer

Elias Aspras (29 years) and Anthony Aspras (36 years) family of Alice Aspras.

George Pappas (71 yrs), Cleo Pappas (35 yrs), Michael Pappas (36 yrs), George Pappas (6 yrs), and Philip Pappas (8 mos) family of Alice Aspras.

 


 

Baby Blessing

Dimitri and Svetlana Paicopoulos present Alexander for the traditional 40 day blessing.

 


 

Schedule of Church Services

  • 2/21  Sunday:                                                         9am/10am          Orthros/Divine Liturgy

 

Also, we are live streaming our services.

Visit https://stdemetrios.org/ where a link to the broadcast will be found.

 


 

St. Demetrios Festival Replacement 

 

 

Dear Parishioners and Friends of St. Demetrios Church

Our annual Greek Festival has unfortunately been canceled this year.  The Parish Council and Father Peter came to this decision after a lot of debate.

Prior to making this decision we actually did study what many other communities had done this past summer and fall as alternatives to their traditional festivals.  Most put on a drive through food only festival.  Our festival planning committee actually met 3 times this fall to begin planning just such an event.  Unfortunately, we discovered that there will be ongoing construction on the sewer system in front of the church through the summer of 2021.

 

 

Each year our community counts on the Greek Festival to raise the $95,000 necessary to balance our budget and continue the ministry of Saint Demetrios.  Our community cannot survive without these funds.  Borrowing money for operating expenses is out of the question. The Parish Council and Father Peter therefore came up with the following strategy to procure the necessary monies.

Drs. Joyce and Anthony Kales and Dr. George Georgakakis would each donate $10,000.  In addition, the community would use a portion of it’s annual gift from the William and Bridget Eaton Partalis Family Trust.  We would also ask 10 parishioners to support what we are calling the “Saint Demetrios Festival Replacement Fund” with individual donations of $1,000.  The remaining estimated $40,000 would hopefully be raised by asking each of our 260 parishioners to consider contributing $160 to the Festival Replacement Fund.  This would get us to our goal of $95,000

At our Winter General Assembly meeting last month we actually had 11 parishioners step up and offer to be $1000 donors.  Since that time we have been blessed with several more such donors.

We now humbly ask all of our Saint Demetrios family to please consider coming to the aid of our parish in this time of great need.  Your gift of $160 will help ensure that our church survives this upcoming year in spite of all the unknowns associated with the ongoing Covid-19 crisis.  Your gift ensures that Saint Demetrios will remain a healthy and vibrant Christian community when the world returns to normalcy.  Please help Saint Demetrios continue its vitally important ministry.

Thank you!

You may mail a check (make sure to note Festival Replacement in the memo) to:

St. Demetrios Church
820 NE 14 Ave.
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33304

Or, visit this link  https://stdemetrios.org/make-a-donation/

 


 

Stewardship

“…The Greatest Of These Is Love” 1 Cor 13:13

 

We ask you to support the worship, service and activities of St. Demetrios Church. Giving to His Church is a way to thank God for His grace, His generosity and His many blessings. Let’s Step Up our gifts of Time Talent and Treasure!

Please fill out a pledge form by either visiting https://stdemetrios.org/our-parish/stewardship/stewardship-form/ or downloading this form.  You can make contributions towards your financial pledge by visiting https://stdemetrios.org/make-a-donation/ .

Thank you!


 

 

Announcements

 

Sunday School News

 

  • Oratorical Festival

The St. Demetrios Oratorical Festival is set for Sunday, March 21. The event will take place after liturgy in the church. To learn more, students and parents may contact James W. Carras at jameswcarras@gmail.com. Below are the topics. Visit https://www.goarch.org/en/oratorical for tips and resources on the topics, the rules, the various scholarship opportunities, and the Metropolis level and Archdiocese level dates.

Junior Division (Grades 7–9) Topics

1. Discuss the challenges and opportunities of watching a church service that is live streamed.
2. Prayer is called a “conversation with God.” Discuss the meaning of prayer in your life.
3. During the pandemic, people noticed that our natural environment became cleaner. What can this teach us about our care for the natural world?
4. Why is the Church still relevant, especially for young people, in our increasingly secular, post-COVID world?
5. Choose one parable from the Gospel of Luke chapters 15 or 16 that is particularly meaningful to you and explain what we can learn from it.

Senior Division (Grades 10–12) Topics

1. During the stay at home period of the pandemic, Orthodox Christians had to find ways to practice their faith without attending church in person or participating in parish activities. Discuss what you learned during those days.
2. In July 2020, a Turkish court gave permission for Hagia Sophia to be converted from a museum into a mosque. Discuss the significance of Hagia Sophia in the history of Christianity and the power of monuments like it to inspire religious identity.
3. We live in a highly polarized society – left vs. right, personal liberty vs. common good, and other issues where it seems everything is politicized. How are we as Orthodox Christians called to navigate this environment?
4. St. Peter writes, “Live as free men, yet without using your freedom as a pretext for evil; but live as servants of God.” (1 Peter 2:16). What is freedom and how does it become a basis for being a servant?
5. In the Psalms we read, “If you, Lord, should mark iniquities, Lord, who could stand? But there is forgiveness with you.” (Psalm 130:3-4, NRSV). Discuss how an Orthodox Christian understands sin, forgiveness, mercy, and repentance.


 

Scholarship News

Applications for the Dr. Helene Tzitsikas Scholarship  for students enrolled in higher education as well as applications for St. Stephen’s Summer Camp are open.  More information about the Dr. Tzitsikas Scholarship can be found on the St. Demetrios website www.stdemetrios.org.  Information about St. Stephen’s Camp can be found on their website St. Stephen’s Summer Camp – Greek Orthodox Metropolis of Atlanta – Atlanta, GA (atlmetropolis.org)  Scholarship applications are available on line at the St. Demetrios website or call the Church Office 954-467-1515 Monday – Thursday.  Deadlines for all applications are May 1, 2021.

 


 

Philoptochos News

 

  • Metropolis Philoptochos Spiritual Retreat

The annual Metropolis Philoptochos Spiritual Retreat will be virtual this year, so we can engage with popular Orthodox author Federica Matthews-Greene and have fellowship with other women from across the Metropolis without the long trek to the Diakonia Center,

All women are invited.  See the flyer attached and click here to register  https://atlmetropolis.org/virtual-spiritual-retreat-2021

Matthews-Greene has written 10 books on the Greek Orthodox faith, and is Khouria/Presvytera at Holy Cross Antiochian Church in Baltimore.

 

  • Membership          

Dear Ladies of St. Demetrios,
This has been a year like none other.  Many of us and our loved ones have faced illness, unemployment, and loneliness.  And yet the women of St. Demetrios have reached out to fill our spiritual, material, and emotional needs. It was women, through the Ladies Philoptochos, St. Elpis (Hope) chapter, who called to check on parishioners, got food and money to families who were suddenly unemployed, called and sent cards to the sick, reached out to our young people, and donated to the needs of greater Ft. Lauderdale.
But our patron St. Elpis wasn’t alone.  She was the daughter of Sophia (Wisdom) and the sister of Pistis (Faith) and Agape (Love).  To continue its work, Philoptochos needs ALL the wisdom, hope, faith, and love of ALL the women of St. Demetrios.
Please use the form below to join or renew for 2021.

 

  • National Philoptochos Department of Social Services


 

Daughters of Penelope News

 

  • Food Drive The Daughters of Penelope are having an Easter Food Drive Drive starting Sunday, February 28th thru March 28th. Non perishable items, grocery store gift cards or monetary donations will be greatly appreciated.
  • Membership Drive We would love to have you join our wonderful Chapter!!  Our next initiation will be in January 2021.  Please contact Erin Ryan at 954 683-6452 or eryan75@gmail.com.   

 


 

Creative Expression and Research Contest



Light a Candle & Say a Prayer at Saint Demetrios

 

“It is impossible to imagine an Orthodox church in which candles are not lit.”
(Blessed Simeon of Thessalonica, 15th Century) 

“I am the light of the world; he who follows me will not walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.” (John 8:12) 

We know that at this time it can be difficult to pray from home and not physically be in the church. One of the first things most people do upon entering an Orthodox Church is to light their candle and offer prayers for one’s personal needs or that of a family member or friend, we also light candles to pray for protection and safety so that we may live this life without fear.

If you wish to light a candle, visit https://saintdemetrios.square.site After you select the candle(s) that you would like us to light and before pressing the “Place Order” button, please submit the names of your loved ones, those who are alive and/or those who have departed this life. During these times we would be happy to light the candle for you and read the names that have been submitted during the Divine Liturgy.

 


 

Dear St. Demetrios Family,

St. Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church, Ft. Lauderdale is open to the faithful.  We are complying with all CDC, State, Local and Archdiocese guidelines.  Here is the list of things that will be taking place on Sundays.

1)  Everyone must wear a mask in order to enter the church.
2)  Before entering the church, the temperature of each person will be taken by a designated person. If the person’s temperature is above 100.4 F he or she will be kindly asked to return to their home, both for their safety and the safety of others.
3) Parish Council will direct each parishioner to the designated X in the pews for each person or household to sit starting in the front of the church and working their way to back.
4) A place to accept offerings will be provided in the Narthex upon entering or leaving.
5) Parishioners are not to move around the church during the services to light candles or venerate icons.
6) Names and phone numbers of each attendee at every service will be taken in the event that a subsequent infection requires tracing.
7) If you have any symptoms of coronavirus, COVID-19 (fever, cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, chills, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat, new loss of taste or smell), you must NOT attend church, and immediately seek medical attention for yourself and your household.
8) Parishioners who are at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19 as defined by civil authorities are given dispensation not to attend services and will be asked to refrain from attending.
9) In terms of preventing the spread of this virus, we ask parishioners to follow CDC directives, which currently include: washing of hands thoroughly and frequently, covering your coughs and sneezes, avoiding sharing personal items, wearing a mask, and maintaining a social distance of six feet.
10) Honor is to be shown to Holy Icons and the Holy Cross by only doing your cross and bowing, keeping in mind not to kiss or to touch the Holy Icons and the Holy Cross.
11) No one is to enter the Holy Altar except the clergy and assigned adult helpers.
12) For Memorials, please write the names of your deceased for the clergy to pray for their souls (without Koliva).
13) Artoclasias will be celebrated as normal.
14) No service books will be left out for common use. This includes papers of any kind (bulletins etc.). Parishioners are encouraged to bring their own service books.
15) During Holy Communion – Communicants must line up row by row (with help from Parish Council) and remain six feet apart using the designated social distancing X’s that have been placed in the church.  Communicants may remove their masks only momentarily to receive Holy Communion.
16)  For the continued safety of those attending church services in person, parishioners should immediately leave when the service is finished. For the sake of others, please do not socialize in the Narthex or other areas of the church or its surrounding buildings or parking lots. Additionally, Sunday Coffee Fellowship hours will be suspended until further notice.

Yours In Christ,
Fr. Peter Zougras

 

The Liturgical Guide and Bulletin for Sunday, February 14th, 2021

 


 

February 14, 2021 ~ Sunday of the Canaanite Woman

 

Holy Father Auxentius of the Mountain
Commemorated on February 14

 

This Saint, who was from the East, lived during the reign of Saint Theodosius the Younger. In 442 he enlisted in the Fourth Military Company of the Scholarii, that is, the Imperial Guard. Afterwards, he became a monk on a certain mountain in Bithynia (which later took his name), not far from Chalcedon. On becoming the archimandrite of the monastics gathered there, and proving himself to be most enduring in asceticism and most Orthodox in his faith, he reposed during the reign of the Emperor Leo the Great of Thrace, who reigned from 457 to 474.

 

 

Cyril, Equal-to-the-Apostles & Teacher of the Slavs
Commemorated on February 14

 

Saint Cyril was born in Thessaloniki in the early 9th century to pious parents. His family was one of only a few Byzantines in Thessaloniki at that time since it was largely populated by Slavs. Growing up in this situation, Cyril learned the Slavonic language, which later in life would serve him and the Church at large. He continued his education in Constantinople with his brother Methodios (see May 11th), each taking to their particular interests: Methodios in politics, and Cyril in philosophy and teaching.

The two brothers were approached in 850 by Saint Photios the Great (see February 6th) to lead a diplomatic mission to the Khazars, the people who inhabited the western shore of the Caspian Sea. Cyril and Methodios accepted this mission and departed to the North. After the success of this trip, the brothers lived for a time in a monastery on Mount Olympus where Methodios became a monk. At this time the brothers utilized their childhood Slavonic education to develop a written alphabet for the Slavonic language, which to this time had never existed. This alphabet became known as the Glagolithic Alphabet. On their own instigation, the brothers began translating the Gospels and liturgical service books into Slavonic.

Providentially, Cyril and Methodios were again called upon for a mission, this time to travel to Moravia to spread the Christian faith to King Rostislav (see May 11th) and his people. The brothers departed in 862, bringing with them their Slavonic alphabet and service books. After five years of service, the brothers made their way to Rome in 867 to have members of their company ordained to the priesthood to aid in the missionary journey. The group of missionaries celebrated the Divine Liturgy in Rome in the Slavonic language for the very first time with members of their party being ordained as they intended. While in Rome, Cyril fell deathly ill. He was tonsured a monk and died. His brother Methodios continued their missionary work, utilizing the Glagolthic Alphabet. Cyril and his brother Methodios are commemorated together on May 11th.

 


 

Liturgical Guide

 

Resurrectional Apolytikion in the Third Mode
Εφραινσθω τ ορνια…
Let the Heavens rejoice; let earthly things be glad; for the Lord hath wrought might with His arm, He hath trampled upon death by death. The first-born of the dead hath He become. From the belly of Hades hath He delivered us, and hath granted great mercy to the world.

Apolytikion for Auxentios of the Mountain in the First Mode
Τής ερήμου πολίτης, καί εν σώματι Άγγελος… 

Thou didst prove to be a citizen of the desert, an angel in the flesh, and a wonderworker, O Auxentius, our God-bearing Father. By fasting, vigil, and prayer thou didst obtain heavenly gifts, and thou healest the sick and the souls of them that have recourse to thee with faith. Glory to Him that hath given thee strength. Glory to Him that hath crowned thee. Glory to Him that worketh healings for all through thee.

Apolytikion of St. Demetrios in the Third Mode
Μέγαν εύρατο εv τοίς κιvδύvοις …
Greatness has been found in danger.  You are champion of the world.  A victor who could turn the nations back.  You boldly encouraged Nestor to defeat Lyaeus in the arena.  Therefore, holy great martyr Demetrios, intercede with Christ our God, to grant us His great mercy.

Seasonal Kontakion in the Second Mode 
Προστασα τν Χριστιανν κατασχυντε…
O Protection of Christians that cannot be put to shame, mediation unto the creator most constant: O despise not the voices of those who have sinned; but be quick, O good one, to come unto our aid, who in faith cry unto thee: Hasten to intercession and speed thou to make supplication, O thou who dost ever protect, O Theotokos, them that honor thee.

Prokeimenon. Third Mode. Psalm 46.6,1. 
Sing praises to our God, sing praises.
Verse: Clap your hands, all you nations.

The reading is from St. Paul’s Second Letter to the Corinthians 6:16-18; 7:1.

Brethren, you are the temple of the living God; as God said, “I will live in them and move among them, and I will be their God, and they shall be my people. Therefore come out from them, and be separate from them, says the Lord, and touch nothing unclean; then I will welcome you, and I will be a father to you, and you shall be my sons and daughters, says the Lord Almighty.” Since we have these promises, beloved, let us cleanse ourselves from every defilement of body and spirit, and make holiness perfect in the fear of God.
The Reading is from Matthew 15:21-28

At that time, Jesus went to the district of Tyre and Sidon. And behold, a Canaanite woman from that region came out and cried, “Have mercy on me, O Lord, Son of David; my daughter is severely possessed by a demon.” But he did not answer her a word. And his disciples came and begged him, saying, “Send her away, for she is crying after us.” He answered, “I was sent only to the lost sheep of the house of Israel.” But she came and knelt before him, saying, “Lord, help me.” And he answered, “It is not fair to take the children’s bread and throw it to the dogs.” She said, “Yes, Lord, yet even the dogs eat the crumbs that fall from their master’s table.” Then Jesus answered her, “O woman, great is your faith! Be it done for you as you desire.” And her daughter was healed instantly.

 


 

Memorial Prayer

 

Mitchel James Thermis (40 days) survived by his wife Loretta, stepson Albert, grandchildren, sister Sophia Thermis, and many nieces and nephews.

Harry Voyages (40 days) survived by family and friends.

 


 

Schedule of Church Services

  • 2/14  Sunday:                                                         9am/10am          Orthros/Divine Liturgy

 

Also, we are live streaming our services.

Visit https://stdemetrios.org/ where a link to the broadcast will be found.

 


 

Stewardship

 

“…The Greatest Of These Is Love” 1 Cor 13:13

We ask you to support the worship, service and activities of St. Demetrios Church. Giving to His Church is a way to thank God for His grace, His generosity and His many blessings. Let’s Step Up our gifts of Time Talent and Treasure!

Please fill out a pledge form by either visiting https://stdemetrios.org/our-parish/stewardship/stewardship-form/ or downloading this form.  You can make contributions towards your financial pledge by visiting https://stdemetrios.org/make-a-donation/ .

Thank you!


 

 

Announcements

 

Sunday School News

    • Oratorical Festival

    The St. Demetrios Oratorical Festival is set for Sunday, March 21. The event will take place after liturgy in the church. To learn more, students and parents may contact James W. Carras at jameswcarras@gmail.com. Below are the topics. Visit https://www.goarch.org/en/oratorical for tips and resources on the topics, the rules, the various scholarship opportunities, and the Metropolis level and Archdiocese level dates.

    Junior Division (Grades 7–9) Topics

    1. Discuss the challenges and opportunities of watching a church service that is live streamed.
    2. Prayer is called a “conversation with God.” Discuss the meaning of prayer in your life.
    3. During the pandemic, people noticed that our natural environment became cleaner. What can this teach us about our care for the natural world?
    4. Why is the Church still relevant, especially for young people, in our increasingly secular, post-COVID world?
    5. Choose one parable from the Gospel of Luke chapters 15 or 16 that is particularly meaningful to you and explain what we can learn from it.

    Senior Division (Grades 10–12) Topics

    1. During the stay at home period of the pandemic, Orthodox Christians had to find ways to practice their faith without attending church in person or participating in parish activities. Discuss what you learned during those days.
    2. In July 2020, a Turkish court gave permission for Hagia Sophia to be converted from a museum into a mosque. Discuss the significance of Hagia Sophia in the history of Christianity and the power of monuments like it to inspire religious identity.
    3. We live in a highly polarized society – left vs. right, personal liberty vs. common good, and other issues where it seems everything is politicized. How are we as Orthodox Christians called to navigate this environment?
    4. St. Peter writes, “Live as free men, yet without using your freedom as a pretext for evil; but live as servants of God.” (1 Peter 2:16). What is freedom and how does it become a basis for being a servant?
    5. In the Psalms we read, “If you, Lord, should mark iniquities, Lord, who could stand? But there is forgiveness with you.” (Psalm 130:3-4, NRSV). Discuss how an Orthodox Christian understands sin, forgiveness, mercy, and repentance.


 

Scholarship News

Applications for the Dr. Helene Tzitsikas Scholarship  for students enrolled in higher education as well as applications for St. Stephen’s Summer Camp are open.  More information about the Dr. Tzitsikas Scholarship can be found on the St. Demetrios website www.stdemetrios.org.  Information about St. Stephen’s Camp can be found on their website St. Stephen’s Summer Camp – Greek Orthodox Metropolis of Atlanta – Atlanta, GA (atlmetropolis.org)  Scholarship applications are available on line at the St. Demetrios website or call the Church Office 954-467-1515 Monday – Thursday.  Deadlines for all applications are May 1, 2021.

 


 

Philoptochos News

  • Thanking Healthcare Workers

You did it again, St. Demetrios.  Thanks to your support, Philoptochos provided100 lunches for healthcare workers at Holy Cross Hospital this week.   Greek Islands Taverna created a lunch of spanakopita, salad and baklava.

 


 

Metropolis Philoptochos Spiritual Retreat

The annual Metropolis Philoptochos Spiritual Retreat will be virtual this year, so we can engage with popular Orthodox author Federica Matthews-Greene and have fellowship with other women from across the Metropolis without the long trek to the Diakonia Center,

All women are invited.  See the flyer attached and click here to register  https://atlmetropolis.org/virtual-spiritual-retreat-2021

Matthews-Greene has written 10 books on the Greek Orthodox faith, and is Khouria/Presvytera at Holy Cross Antiochian Church in Baltimore.

  • Membership          

Dear Ladies of St. Demetrios,
This has been a year like none other.  Many of us and our loved ones have faced illness, unemployment, and loneliness.  And yet the women of St. Demetrios have reached out to fill our spiritual, material, and emotional needs. It was women, through the Ladies Philoptochos, St. Elpis (Hope) chapter, who called to check on parishioners, got food and money to families who were suddenly unemployed, called and sent cards to the sick, reached out to our young people, and donated to the needs of greater Ft. Lauderdale.
But our patron St. Elpis wasn’t alone.  She was the daughter of Sophia (Wisdom) and the sister of Pistis (Faith) and Agape (Love).  To continue its work, Philoptochos needs ALL the wisdom, hope, faith, and love of ALL the women of St. Demetrios.
Please use the form below to join or renew for 2021.

 

  • National Philoptochos Department of Social Services

 

Daughters of Penelope News

 

  •  Membership Drive We would love to have you join our wonderful Chapter!!  Our next initiation will be in January 2021.  Please contact Erin Ryan at 954 683-6452 or eryan75@gmail.com.
  •   Meeting Our next meeting will be held on the 3rd Wednesday, February 17th at 7:30 pm via Zoom. This month only.
  •   Valentines Bingo Virtual Valentine Bingo Friday February 12th 7:30 pm please join us! All proceeds are for St. Demetrios.

 


 

Creative Expression and Research Contest

 




Light a Candle & Say a Prayer at Saint Demetrios

 

“It is impossible to imagine an Orthodox church in which candles are not lit.”
(Blessed Simeon of Thessalonica, 15th Century) 

“I am the light of the world; he who follows me will not walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.” (John 8:12) 

We know that at this time it can be difficult to pray from home and not physically be in the church. One of the first things most people do upon entering an Orthodox Church is to light their candle and offer prayers for one’s personal needs or that of a family member or friend, we also light candles to pray for protection and safety so that we may live this life without fear.

If you wish to light a candle, visit https://saintdemetrios.square.site After you select the candle(s) that you would like us to light and before pressing the “Place Order” button, please submit the names of your loved ones, those who are alive and/or those who have departed this life. During these times we would be happy to light the candle for you and read the names that have been submitted during the Divine Liturgy.

 


 

Dear St. Demetrios Family,

St. Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church, Ft. Lauderdale is open to the faithful.  We are complying with all CDC, State, Local and Archdiocese guidelines.  Here is the list of things that will be taking place on Sundays.

1)  Everyone must wear a mask in order to enter the church.
2)  Before entering the church, the temperature of each person will be taken by a designated person. If the person’s temperature is above 100.4 F he or she will be kindly asked to return to their home, both for their safety and the safety of others.
3) Parish Council will direct each parishioner to the designated X in the pews for each person or household to sit starting in the front of the church and working their way to back.
4) A place to accept offerings will be provided in the Narthex upon entering or leaving.
5) Parishioners are not to move around the church during the services to light candles or venerate icons.
6) Names and phone numbers of each attendee at every service will be taken in the event that a subsequent infection requires tracing.
7) If you have any symptoms of coronavirus, COVID-19 (fever, cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, chills, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat, new loss of taste or smell), you must NOT attend church, and immediately seek medical attention for yourself and your household.
8) Parishioners who are at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19 as defined by civil authorities are given dispensation not to attend services and will be asked to refrain from attending.
9) In terms of preventing the spread of this virus, we ask parishioners to follow CDC directives, which currently include: washing of hands thoroughly and frequently, covering your coughs and sneezes, avoiding sharing personal items, wearing a mask, and maintaining a social distance of six feet.
10) Honor is to be shown to Holy Icons and the Holy Cross by only doing your cross and bowing, keeping in mind not to kiss or to touch the Holy Icons and the Holy Cross.
11) No one is to enter the Holy Altar except the clergy and assigned adult helpers.
12) For Memorials, please write the names of your deceased for the clergy to pray for their souls (without Koliva).
13) Artoclasias will be celebrated as normal.
14) No service books will be left out for common use. This includes papers of any kind (bulletins etc.). Parishioners are encouraged to bring their own service books.
15) During Holy Communion – Communicants must line up row by row (with help from Parish Council) and remain six feet apart using the designated social distancing X’s that have been placed in the church.  Communicants may remove their masks only momentarily to receive Holy Communion.
16)  For the continued safety of those attending church services in person, parishioners should immediately leave when the service is finished. For the sake of others, please do not socialize in the Narthex or other areas of the church or its surrounding buildings or parking lots. Additionally, Sunday Coffee Fellowship hours will be suspended until further notice.

Yours In Christ,
Fr. Peter Zougras

The Liturgical Guide and Bulletin for Sunday, February 7th, 2021

 


 

February 7, 2021 ~ 16th Sunday of Matthew

 

Parthenius, Bishop of Lampsacus
Commemorated on February 7

 

Saint Parthenius was born in Melitopolis on the Hellespont, the son of a deacon named Christopher. Because of the miracles that he wrought even as a young man, he was ordained a priest and then Bishop of Lampsacus in the days of Saint Constantine the Great, from whom he received great gifts and authority both to overturn the altars of the idols and to raise up a church to the glory of Christ. Working many miracles throughout his life, he reposed in peace an old man and full of days. February 07

 

 

Luke of Mount Stirion
Commemorated on February 7

 

Saint Luke was the descendant of a family from Aegina which, because of the frequent invasions of the Saracens, left Aegina and dwelt in Phocis, where the Saint was born in 896. From his earliest childhood Luke ate neither flesh, nor cheese, nor eggs, but gave himself over with his whole soul to hardship and fasting for the love of heavenly blessings, often giving away his clothing to the poor, for which his father punished him. After his father’s death he secretly left home to become a monk, but the Lord, inclining to the fervent prayers of his mother, made him known, and he returned to her for a time to care for her. For many years he lived as a hermit, moving from place to place; he spent the last part of his life on Mount Stirion at Phocis, where there is a city named Stiris. The grace of God that was in him made him a wonder-worker, and his tomb in the monastery of Hosios Loukas, famous for its mosaics, became a source of healings and place of pilgrimage for the faithful. According to some he reposed in the year 946; according to others, in 953.

 


 

Liturgical Guide

 

Resurrectional Apolytikion in the Second Mode
τε κατλθες πρς τν θνατον…
When Thou didst descend unto death, O Life Immortal, then didst Thou slay Hades with the lightning of Thy Divinity. And when Thou didst also raise the dead out of the nethermost depths, all the powers in the Heavens cried out: O Life-giver, Christ our God, glory be to Thee.

Apolytikion for Afterfeast of the Presentation in the First Mode
Χαῖ
ρε κεχαριτωμνη Θεοτκε Παρθνε… 
Rejoice, thou who art full of grace, O Virgin Theotokos, for from thee hath risen the Sun of Righteousness, Christ our God, enlightening those in darkness. Rejoice, thou also, O righteous Elder, as thou receivest in thine arms the Redeemer of our souls, Who also granteth unto us the Resurrection.

Apolytikion of St. Demetrios in the Third Mode
Μέγαν εύρατο εv τοίς κιvδύvοις …
Greatness has been found in danger.  You are champion of the world.  A victor who could turn the nations back.  You boldly encouraged Nestor to defeat Lyaeus in the arena.  Therefore, holy great martyr Demetrios, intercede with Christ our God, to grant us His great mercy.

Seasonal Kontakion in the First Mode 
μτραν παρθενικν γισας τ τκω σου…
Your birth sanctified a Virgin’s womb and properly blessed the hands of Symeon. Having now come and saved us O Christ our God, give peace to Your commonwealth in troubled times and strengthen those in authority, whom You love, as only the loving One.

Prokeimenon. Second Mode. Psalm 117.14,18. 
The Lord is my strength and my song.
Verse: The Lord has chastened me sorely.

The reading is from St. Paul’s Second Letter to the Corinthians 6:1-10.

Brethren, working together with him, we entreat you not to accept the grace of God in vain. For he says, “At the acceptable time I have listened to you, and helped you on the day of salvation.” Behold, now is the acceptable time; behold, now is the day of salvation. We put no obstacle in any one’s way, so that no fault may be found with our ministry, but as servants of God we commend ourselves in every way: through great endurance, in afflictions, hardships, calamities, beatings, imprisonments, tumults, labors, watching, hunger; by purity, knowledge, forbearance, kindness, the Holy Spirit, genuine love, truthful speech, and the power of God; with the weapons of righteousness for the right hand and for the left; in honor and dishonor, in ill repute and good repute. We are treated as impostors, and yet are true; as unknown, and yet well known; as dying, and behold we live; as punished, and yet not killed; as sorrowful, yet always rejoicing; as poor, yet making many rich; as having nothing, and yet possessing everything.
The Reading is from Matthew 25:14-30

The Lord said this parable: “A man going on a journey called his servants and entrusted to them his property; to one he gave five talents, to another two, to another one, to each according to his ability. Then he went away. He who had received the five talents went at once and traded with them; and he made five talents more. So also, he who had the two talents made two talents more. But he who had received the one talent went and dug in the ground and hid his master’s money. Now after a long time the master of those servants came and settled accounts with them. And he who had received the five talents came forward, bringing five talents more, saying, ‘Master, you delivered to me five talents; here I have made five talents more.’ His master said to him, ‘Well done, good and faithful servant; you have been faithful over a little, I will set you over much; enter into the joy of your master.’ And he also who had the two talents came forward, saying, ‘Master, you delivered to me two talents; here I have made two talents more.’ His master said to him, ‘Well done, good and faithful servant; you have been faithful over a little, I will set you over much; enter into the joy of your master.’ He also who had received the one talent came forward, saying, ‘Master, I knew you to be a hard man, reaping where you did not sow, and gathering where you did not winnow; so I was afraid, and I went and hid your talent in the ground. Here you have what is yours.’ But his master answered him, ‘You wicked and slothful servant! You knew that I reap where I have not sowed, and gather where I have not winnowed? Then you ought to have invested my money with the bankers, and at my coming I should have received what was my own with interest. So take the talent from him, and give it to him who has the ten talents. For to every one who has will more be given, and he will have abundance; but from him who has not, even what he has will be taken away. And cast the worthless servant into the outer darkness; there men will weep and gnash their teeth.” As he said these things he cried out: “He who has ears to hear, let him hear!”


 

Memorial Prayer

Eleftheria Gerosideris (40 days) survived by her sisters Happy Vasil and Julia Papatzanakis.

Angela Manolatos (1 year) survived by son Emanuel (Kathy) Bacolas, Katie Bacolas, Michael Bacolas, and Zitis/Velisarios families.

Efstratios Planakis (2 years) beloved father, grandfather and brother, survived by his children: Andreas, Clare, Chris, Beth, his grandchildren: Chloe, Lucas, Nikos & Alexandra, and his sisters: Koula and Efstratia.

 

Trisagion Prayer

Gerasimos, Joan, Aglaia, John, Spero, Anastasios, Engolpia survived by the Emanuel Bacolas family.

 


 

Schedule of Church Services

  • 2/07  Sunday:                                                         9am/10am          Orthros/Divine Liturgy

Also, we are live streaming our services.

Visit https://stdemetrios.org/ where a link to the broadcast will be found.

 


 

Stewardship

 

“…The Greatest Of These Is Love” 1 Cor 13:13

We ask you to support the worship, service and activities of St. Demetrios Church. Giving to His Church is a way to thank God for His grace, His generosity and His many blessings. Let’s Step Up our gifts of Time Talent and Treasure!

Please fill out a pledge form by either visiting https://stdemetrios.org/our-parish/stewardship/stewardship-form/ or downloading this form.  You can make contributions towards your financial pledge by visiting https://stdemetrios.org/make-a-donation/ .

Thank you!


 

 

Announcements

 

Sunday School News

  • Oratorical Festival

The St. Demetrios Oratorical Festival is set for Sunday, March 21. The event will take place after liturgy in the church. To learn more, students and parents may contact James W. Carras at jameswcarras@gmail.com. Below are the topics. Visit https://www.goarch.org/en/oratorical for tips and resources on the topics, the rules, the various scholarship opportunities, and the Metropolis level and Archdiocese level dates.

Junior Division (Grades 7–9) Topics

1. Discuss the challenges and opportunities of watching a church service that is live streamed.
2. Prayer is called a “conversation with God.” Discuss the meaning of prayer in your life.
3. During the pandemic, people noticed that our natural environment became cleaner. What can this teach us about our care for the natural world?
4. Why is the Church still relevant, especially for young people, in our increasingly secular, post-COVID world?
5. Choose one parable from the Gospel of Luke chapters 15 or 16 that is particularly meaningful to you and explain what we can learn from it.

Senior Division (Grades 10–12) Topics

1. During the stay at home period of the pandemic, Orthodox Christians had to find ways to practice their faith without attending church in person or participating in parish activities. Discuss what you learned during those days.
2. In July 2020, a Turkish court gave permission for Hagia Sophia to be converted from a museum into a mosque. Discuss the significance of Hagia Sophia in the history of Christianity and the power of monuments like it to inspire religious identity.
3. We live in a highly polarized society – left vs. right, personal liberty vs. common good, and other issues where it seems everything is politicized. How are we as Orthodox Christians called to navigate this environment?
4. St. Peter writes, “Live as free men, yet without using your freedom as a pretext for evil; but live as servants of God.” (1 Peter 2:16). What is freedom and how does it become a basis for being a servant?
5. In the Psalms we read, “If you, Lord, should mark iniquities, Lord, who could stand? But there is forgiveness with you.” (Psalm 130:3-4, NRSV). Discuss how an Orthodox Christian understands sin, forgiveness, mercy, and repentance.

 


 

Scholarship News

Applications for the Dr. Helene Tzitsikas Scholarship  for students enrolled in higher education as well as applications for St. Stephen’s Summer Camp are open.  More information about the Dr. Tzitsikas Scholarship can be found on the St. Demetrios website www.stdemetrios.org.  Information about St. Stephen’s Camp can be found on their website St. Stephen’s Summer Camp – Greek Orthodox Metropolis of Atlanta – Atlanta, GA (atlmetropolis.org)  Scholarship applications are available on line at the St. Demetrios website or call the Church Office 954-467-1515 Monday – Thursday.  Deadlines for all applications are May 1, 2021.

 


 

Philoptochos News

  • Thanking Healthcare Workers

See the details below. If you would like to help us reach out, visit https://ladies-philoptochos-of-st-demetrios.square.site/

  • Metropolis Philoptochos Spiritual Retreat

The annual Metropolis Philoptochos Spiritual Retreat will be virtual this year, so we can engage with popular Orthodox author Federica Matthews-Greene and have fellowship with other women from across the Metropolis without the long trek to the Diakonia Center,

All women are invited.  See the flyer attached and click here to register  https://atlmetropolis.org/virtual-spiritual-retreat-2021

Matthews-Greene has written 10 books on the Greek Orthodox faith, and is Khouria/Presvytera at Holy Cross Antiochian Church in Baltimore.

  • Membership          

Dear Ladies of St. Demetrios,
This has been a year like none other.  Many of us and our loved ones have faced illness, unemployment, and loneliness.  And yet the women of St. Demetrios have reached out to fill our spiritual, material, and emotional needs. It was women, through the Ladies Philoptochos, St. Elpis (Hope) chapter, who called to check on parishioners, got food and money to families who were suddenly unemployed, called and sent cards to the sick, reached out to our young people, and donated to the needs of greater Ft. Lauderdale.
But our patron St. Elpis wasn’t alone.  She was the daughter of Sophia (Wisdom) and the sister of Pistis (Faith) and Agape (Love).  To continue its work, Philoptochos needs ALL the wisdom, hope, faith, and love of ALL the women of St. Demetrios.
Please use the form below to join or renew for 2021.

 

Daughters of Penelope News

 

  •  Membership Drive We would love to have you join our wonderful Chapter!!  Our next initiation will be in January 2021.  Please contact Erin Ryan at 954 683-6452 or eryan75@gmail.com.
  •   Meeting Our next meeting will be held on the 3rd Wednesday, February 17th at 7:30 pm via Zoom. This month only.
  •   Valentines Bingo Virtual Valentine Bingo Friday February 12th 7:30 pm please join us! All proceeds are for St. Demetrios.

 


 

Creative Expression and Research Contest

 



Light a Candle & Say a Prayer at Saint Demetrios

 

“It is impossible to imagine an Orthodox church in which candles are not lit.”
(Blessed Simeon of Thessalonica, 15th Century) 

“I am the light of the world; he who follows me will not walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.” (John 8:12) 

We know that at this time it can be difficult to pray from home and not physically be in the church. One of the first things most people do upon entering an Orthodox Church is to light their candle and offer prayers for one’s personal needs or that of a family member or friend, we also light candles to pray for protection and safety so that we may live this life without fear.

If you wish to light a candle, visit https://saintdemetrios.square.site After you select the candle(s) that you would like us to light and before pressing the “Place Order” button, please submit the names of your loved ones, those who are alive and/or those who have departed this life. During these times we would be happy to light the candle for you and read the names that have been submitted during the Divine Liturgy.

 


 

Dear St. Demetrios Family,

St. Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church, Ft. Lauderdale is open to the faithful.  We are complying with all CDC, State, Local and Archdiocese guidelines.  Here is the list of things that will be taking place on Sundays.

1)  Everyone must wear a mask in order to enter the church.
2)  Before entering the church, the temperature of each person will be taken by a designated person. If the person’s temperature is above 100.4 F he or she will be kindly asked to return to their home, both for their safety and the safety of others.
3) Parish Council will direct each parishioner to the designated X in the pews for each person or household to sit starting in the front of the church and working their way to back.
4) A place to accept offerings will be provided in the Narthex upon entering or leaving.
5) Parishioners are not to move around the church during the services to light candles or venerate icons.
6) Names and phone numbers of each attendee at every service will be taken in the event that a subsequent infection requires tracing.
7) If you have any symptoms of coronavirus, COVID-19 (fever, cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, chills, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat, new loss of taste or smell), you must NOT attend church, and immediately seek medical attention for yourself and your household.
8) Parishioners who are at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19 as defined by civil authorities are given dispensation not to attend services and will be asked to refrain from attending.
9) In terms of preventing the spread of this virus, we ask parishioners to follow CDC directives, which currently include: washing of hands thoroughly and frequently, covering your coughs and sneezes, avoiding sharing personal items, wearing a mask, and maintaining a social distance of six feet.
10) Honor is to be shown to Holy Icons and the Holy Cross by only doing your cross and bowing, keeping in mind not to kiss or to touch the Holy Icons and the Holy Cross.
11) No one is to enter the Holy Altar except the clergy and assigned adult helpers.
12) For Memorials, please write the names of your deceased for the clergy to pray for their souls (without Koliva).
13) Artoclasias will be celebrated as normal.
14) No service books will be left out for common use. This includes papers of any kind (bulletins etc.). Parishioners are encouraged to bring their own service books.
15) During Holy Communion – Communicants must line up row by row (with help from Parish Council) and remain six feet apart using the designated social distancing X’s that have been placed in the church.  Communicants may remove their masks only momentarily to receive Holy Communion.
16)  For the continued safety of those attending church services in person, parishioners should immediately leave when the service is finished. For the sake of others, please do not socialize in the Narthex or other areas of the church or its surrounding buildings or parking lots. Additionally, Sunday Coffee Fellowship hours will be suspended until further notice.

Yours In Christ,
Fr. Peter Zougras

 

 

 

 

 

The Liturgical Guide and Bulletin for Sunday, January 31, 2021

 


 

January 31, 2021 ~ Sunday of Zacchaeus

 

 

 

This is one of the preparatory Sundays before the beginning of Great Lent. On this day we learn about “Desire for God” through hearing the story of one who was willing to sacrifice his pride, status and wealth in order to be near Jesus.

This event tells how Christ brought salvation to a sinful man, and how his life was changed simply because he “sought to see who Jesus was” (Luke 19:3). The desire and effort to see Jesus begins the entire movement through Lent towards Pascha. It is the first movement of salvation.

Our Lenten journey begins with a recognition of our own sinfulness, just as Zacchaeus recognized his. He promised to make restitution by giving half of his wealth to the poor, and by paying to those he had falsely accused four times as much as they had lost.

The example of Zacchaeus teaches us that we should turn away from our sins, and atone for them. It also teaches that we can be assured of God’s mercy and compassion through Christ’s words, “Today salvation has come to this house” (Luke 19:9).

 

 

Cyrus & John the Unmercenaries 
Commemorated on January 31

 

These Saints lived during the years of Diocletian. Saint Cyrus was from Alexandria, and Saint John was from Edessa of Mesopotamia. Because of the persecution of that time, Cyrus fled to the Gulf of Arabia, where there was a small community of monks. John, who was a soldier, heard of Cyrus’ fame and came to join him. Henceforth, they passed their life working every virtue, and healing every illness and disease freely by the grace of Christ; hence their title of “Unmercenaries.” They heard that a certain woman, named Athanasia, had been apprehended together with her three daughters, Theodora, Theoctiste, and Eudoxia, and taken to the tribunal for their confession of the Faith. Fearing lest the tender young maidens be terrified by the torments and renounce Christ, they went to strengthen them in their contest in martyrdom; therefore they too were seized. After Cyrus and John and those sacred women had been greatly tormented, all were beheaded in the year 292. Their tomb became a renowned shrine in Egypt, and a place of universal pilgrimage. It was found in the area of the modern day resort near Alexandria named Abu Kyr.

 


 

Liturgical Guide

 

Resurrectional Apolytikion in the First Mode
Το λθου σφραγισθντος π τν ουδαων…
Although the stone was sealed by the Jews, and the soldiers guarded Your most pure body, You arose on the third day, O Savior, giving life to the world. For this reason, the heavenly powers cried out to you, O Giver of Life: Glory to Your resurrection, O Christ! Glory to Your kingdom! Glory to Your dispensation, only Lover of Mankind!

Apolytikion for Unmercenaries Cyrus & John in the Plagal First Mode
Τὰ θαύματα τῶν Ἁγίων σου Μαρτύρων… 

Since Thou hast given us the miracles of Thy holy Martyrs as an invincible battlement, by their entreaties scatter the counsels of the heathen, O Christ our God, and strenghten the faith of Orthodox Christians, since Thou alone art good and the Friend of man.

Apolytikion of St. Demetrios in the Third Mode
Μέγαν εύρατο εv τοίς κιvδύvοις …
Greatness has been found in danger.  You are champion of the world.  A victor who could turn the nations back.  You boldly encouraged Nestor to defeat Lyaeus in the arena.  Therefore, holy great martyr Demetrios, intercede with Christ our God, to grant us His great mercy.

Seasonal Kontakion in the First Mode 
μτραν παρθενικν γισας τ τκω σου…
Your birth sanctified a Virgin’s womb and properly blessed the hands of Symeon. Having now come and saved us O Christ our God, give peace to Your commonwealth in troubled times and strengthen those in authority, whom You love, as only the loving One.

Prokeimenon. First Mode. Psalm 32.22,1. 
Let your mercy, O Lord, be upon us.
Verse: Rejoice in the Lord, O ye righteous.

 

The reading is from St. Paul’s First Letter to Timothy 4:9-15.

Timothy, my son, the saying is sure and worthy of full acceptance. For to this end we toil and suffer reproach, because we have our hope set on the living God, who is the Savior of all men, especially of those who believe. Command and teach these things. Let no one despise your youth, but set the believers an example in speech and conduct, in love, in faith, in purity. Till I come, attend to the public reading of scripture, to preaching, to teaching. Do not neglect the gift you have, which was given you by prophetic utterance when the council of elders laid their hands upon you. Practice these duties, devote yourself to them, so that all may see your progress.
The Reading is from Luke 19:1-10

At that time, Jesus was passing through Jericho. And there was a man named Zacchaios; he was a chief collector, and rich. And he sought to see who Jesus was, but could not, on account of the crowd, because he was small of stature. So he ran on ahead and climbed up into a sycamore tree to see him, for he was to pass that way. And when Jesus came to the place, he looked up and said to him, “Zacchaios, make haste and come down; for I must stay at your house today.” So he made haste and came down, and received him joyfully. And when they saw it they all murmured, “He has gone in to be the guest of a man who is a sinner.” And Zacchaios stood and said to the Lord, “Behold, Lord, the half of my goods I give to the poor; and if I have defrauded any one of anything, I restore it fourfold.” And Jesus said to him, “Today salvation has come to this house, since he also is a son of Abraham. For the Son of man came to seek and to save the lost.”


 

Memorial Prayer

Nikolaos Stratoudakis (40 days) survived by his wife Niki, his daughter Angeliki (George) Ioannou, his son George (Dorothea), and his grandchildren, Yianni, George Jr., and Christina Marina Ioannou, and Nicholas and Dimitri Stratoudakis.

Theodora Kantzavelos (40 days) mother of George, Sotiri (Mary), and Aspasia (Tom), 6 grandchildren and 9 great grandchildren.

 

Trisagion Prayer

 

Victor G. Vogis (20 years) survived by his parents Victor and Margo, his siblings Katya (Omar) and Esther (Tony) and his niece Margo Marie.

 


 

Schedule of Church Services

  • 1/31  Sunday:                                                         9am/10am          Orthros/Divine Liturgy

Also, we are live streaming our services.

Visit https://stdemetrios.org/ where a link to the broadcast will be found.

 


 

Stewardship

 

“…The Greatest Of These Is Love” 1 Cor 13:13

We ask you to support the worship, service and activities of St. Demetrios Church. Giving to His Church is a way to thank God for His grace, His generosity and His many blessings. Let’s Step Up our gifts of Time Talent and Treasure!

Please fill out a pledge form by either visiting https://stdemetrios.org/our-parish/stewardship/stewardship-form/ or downloading this form.  You can make contributions towards your financial pledge by visiting https://stdemetrios.org/make-a-donation/ .

Thank you!


 

Thank You

Thank you to all who took time out of their weekend to participate in the landscape/church cleanup.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Announcements

 

The Three Hierarchs

In celebration of the Three Hierarchs, the Greek School will share a short presentation.  The main speaker will be Xenya Currie; a student in the Advanced Greek Language class.

Sunday School News

  • Oratorical Festival

The St. Demetrios Oratorical Festival is set for Sunday, March 21. The event will take place after liturgy in the church. To learn more, students and parents may contact James W. Carras at jameswcarras@gmail.com. Below are the topics. Visit https://www.goarch.org/en/oratorical for tips and resources on the topics, the rules, the various scholarship opportunities, and the Metropolis level and Archdiocese level dates.

Junior Division (Grades 7–9) Topics

1. Discuss the challenges and opportunities of watching a church service that is live streamed.
2. Prayer is called a “conversation with God.” Discuss the meaning of prayer in your life.
3. During the pandemic, people noticed that our natural environment became cleaner. What can this teach us about our care for the natural world?
4. Why is the Church still relevant, especially for young people, in our increasingly secular, post-COVID world?
5. Choose one parable from the Gospel of Luke chapters 15 or 16 that is particularly meaningful to you and explain what we can learn from it.

Senior Division (Grades 10–12) Topics

1. During the stay at home period of the pandemic, Orthodox Christians had to find ways to practice their faith without attending church in person or participating in parish activities. Discuss what you learned during those days.
2. In July 2020, a Turkish court gave permission for Hagia Sophia to be converted from a museum into a mosque. Discuss the significance of Hagia Sophia in the history of Christianity and the power of monuments like it to inspire religious identity.
3. We live in a highly polarized society – left vs. right, personal liberty vs. common good, and other issues where it seems everything is politicized. How are we as Orthodox Christians called to navigate this environment?
4. St. Peter writes, “Live as free men, yet without using your freedom as a pretext for evil; but live as servants of God.” (1 Peter 2:16). What is freedom and how does it become a basis for being a servant?
5. In the Psalms we read, “If you, Lord, should mark iniquities, Lord, who could stand? But there is forgiveness with you.” (Psalm 130:3-4, NRSV). Discuss how an Orthodox Christian understands sin, forgiveness, mercy, and repentance.

 


 

Scholarship News

Applications for the Dr. Helene Tzitsikas Scholarship  for students enrolled in higher education as well as applications for St. Stephen’s Summer Camp are open.  More information about the Dr. Tzitsikas Scholarship can be found on the St. Demetrios website www.stdemetrios.org.  Information about St. Stephen’s Camp can be found on their website St. Stephen’s Summer Camp – Greek Orthodox Metropolis of Atlanta – Atlanta, GA (atlmetropolis.org)  Scholarship applications are available on line at the St. Demetrios website or call the Church Office 954-467-1515 Monday – Thursday.  Deadlines for all applications are May 1, 2021.

 


 

Philoptochos News

  • Thanking Healthcare Workers

See the details below. If you would like to help us reach out, visit https://ladies-philoptochos-of-st-demetrios.square.site/

  • Thank you for supporting St. Basil’s Academy

Thank you for donating to help the young people at St. Basil’s Academy.  With your donations, including $100 from our own young people in GOYA and $100 from Dance, we were able to donate $400 to St. Basil’s.

  • Membership          

Dear Ladies of St. Demetrios,
This has been a year like none other.  Many of us and our loved ones have faced illness, unemployment, and loneliness.  And yet the women of St. Demetrios have reached out to fill our spiritual, material, and emotional needs. It was women, through the Ladies Philoptochos, St. Elpis (Hope) chapter, who called to check on parishioners, got food and money to families who were suddenly unemployed, called and sent cards to the sick, reached out to our young people, and donated to the needs of greater Ft. Lauderdale.
But our patron St. Elpis wasn’t alone.  She was the daughter of Sophia (Wisdom) and the sister of Pistis (Faith) and Agape (Love).  To continue its work, Philoptochos needs ALL the wisdom, hope, faith, and love of ALL the women of St. Demetrios.
Please use the form below to join or renew for 2021.

 


 

Creative Expression and Research Contest

 


 

Daughters of Penelope News

 

  • Membership Drive

We would love to have you join our wonderful Chapter!!  Our next initiation will be in January 2021.  Please contact Erin Ryan at 954 683-6452 or eryan75@gmail.com.

 

  • Valentines Bingo

 



Light a Candle & Say a Prayer at Saint Demetrios

 

“It is impossible to imagine an Orthodox church in which candles are not lit.”
(Blessed Simeon of Thessalonica, 15th Century) 

“I am the light of the world; he who follows me will not walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.” (John 8:12) 

We know that at this time it can be difficult to pray from home and not physically be in the church. One of the first things most people do upon entering an Orthodox Church is to light their candle and offer prayers for one’s personal needs or that of a family member or friend, we also light candles to pray for protection and safety so that we may live this life without fear.

If you wish to light a candle, visit https://saintdemetrios.square.site After you select the candle(s) that you would like us to light and before pressing the “Place Order” button, please submit the names of your loved ones, those who are alive and/or those who have departed this life. During these times we would be happy to light the candle for you and read the names that have been submitted during the Divine Liturgy.

 


 

Dear St. Demetrios Family,

St. Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church, Ft. Lauderdale is open to the faithful.  We are complying with all CDC, State, Local and Archdiocese guidelines.  Here is the list of things that will be taking place on Sundays.

1)  Everyone must wear a mask in order to enter the church.
2)  Before entering the church, the temperature of each person will be taken by a designated person. If the person’s temperature is above 100.4 F he or she will be kindly asked to return to their home, both for their safety and the safety of others.
3) Parish Council will direct each parishioner to the designated X in the pews for each person or household to sit starting in the front of the church and working their way to back.
4) A place to accept offerings will be provided in the Narthex upon entering or leaving.
5) Parishioners are not to move around the church during the services to light candles or venerate icons.
6) Names and phone numbers of each attendee at every service will be taken in the event that a subsequent infection requires tracing.
7) If you have any symptoms of coronavirus, COVID-19 (fever, cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, chills, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat, new loss of taste or smell), you must NOT attend church, and immediately seek medical attention for yourself and your household.
8) Parishioners who are at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19 as defined by civil authorities are given dispensation not to attend services and will be asked to refrain from attending.
9) In terms of preventing the spread of this virus, we ask parishioners to follow CDC directives, which currently include: washing of hands thoroughly and frequently, covering your coughs and sneezes, avoiding sharing personal items, wearing a mask, and maintaining a social distance of six feet.
10) Honor is to be shown to Holy Icons and the Holy Cross by only doing your cross and bowing, keeping in mind not to kiss or to touch the Holy Icons and the Holy Cross.
11) No one is to enter the Holy Altar except the clergy and assigned adult helpers.
12) For Memorials, please write the names of your deceased for the clergy to pray for their souls (without Koliva).
13) Artoclasias will be celebrated as normal.
14) No service books will be left out for common use. This includes papers of any kind (bulletins etc.). Parishioners are encouraged to bring their own service books.
15) During Holy Communion – Communicants must line up row by row (with help from Parish Council) and remain six feet apart using the designated social distancing X’s that have been placed in the church.  Communicants may remove their masks only momentarily to receive Holy Communion.
16)  For the continued safety of those attending church services in person, parishioners should immediately leave when the service is finished. For the sake of others, please do not socialize in the Narthex or other areas of the church or its surrounding buildings or parking lots. Additionally, Sunday Coffee Fellowship hours will be suspended until further notice.

Yours In Christ,
Fr. Peter Zougras

 

 

 

 

 

The Liturgical Guide and Bulletin for Sunday, January 24, 2021

 


 

January 24, 2021 ~ 14th Sunday of Luke

 

 

Xenia, Deaconess of Rome
Commemorated on January 24

 

Our righteous Mother Xenia of Rome was of a distinguished family. While her parents were preparing to wed her, she stole away secretly, taking two handmaids with her, and departed for Mylasa of Karia in Asia Minor, and there she completed her life in asceticism. She was ordained deaconess by Paul, her spiritual father, who became Bishop of Mylasa. Although she was originally named Eusebia, to conceal her identity, she took the name Xenia – which means “stranger” in Greek – because of her estrangement from her country.

 


 

Liturgical Guide

 

Resurrectional Apolytikion in the Plagal Fourth Mode
ξ ψους κατλθες εσπλαγχνος…
From on high didst Thou descend, O Compassionate One; to burial of three days hast Thou submitted that Thou mightest free us from our passions. O our Life and Resurrection, Lord, glory be to Thee.

Apolytikion of St. Demetrios in the Third Mode
Μέγαν εύρατο εv τοίς κιvδύvοις …
Greatness has been found in danger.  You are champion of the world.  A victor who could turn the nations back.  You boldly encouraged Nestor to defeat Lyaeus in the arena.  Therefore, holy great martyr Demetrios, intercede with Christ our God, to grant us His great mercy.

Seasonal Kontakion in the First Mode 
μτραν παρθενικν γισας τ τκω σου…
Your birth sanctified a Virgin’s womb and properly blessed the hands of Symeon. Having now come and saved us O Christ our God, give peace to Your commonwealth in troubled times and strengthen those in authority, whom You love, as only the loving One.

 

Prokeimenon. Plagal Fourth Mode. Psalm 75.11,1. 
Make your vows to the Lord our God and perform them.
Verse: God is known in Judah; his name is great in Israel.

 

The reading is from St. Paul’s Letter to Timothy 1:15-17.

Timothy, my son, the saying is sure and worthy of full acceptance, that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners. And I am the foremost of sinners; but I received mercy for this reason, that in me, as the foremost, Jesus Christ might display his perfect patience for an example to those who were to believe in him for eternal life. To the King of ages, immortal, invisible, the only God, be honor and glory to the ages of ages. Amen.

The Reading is from Luke 18:35-43

At that time, as Jesus drew near to Jericho, a blind man was sitting by the roadside begging; and hearing a multitude going by, he inquired what this meant. They told him, “Jesus of Nazareth is passing by.” And he cried, “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me!” And those who were in front rebuked him, telling him to be silent; but he cried out all the more, “Son of David, have mercy on me!” And Jesus stopped, and commanded him to be brought to him; and when he came near, he asked him, “What do you want me to do for you?” He said, “Lord, let me receive my sight.” And Jesus said to him, “Receive your sight; your faith has made you well.” And immediately he received his sight and followed him, glorifying God; and all the people, when they saw it, gave praise to God.

 


 

Trisagion Prayer

 

Athina Sclavounos (4 years) survived by her daughters and their families.

Spiros Sclavounos (19 year) survived by his daughters and their families.

Antonios Bourlotos (23 years) survived by his wife Matina, daughters Christina (Michael) and Maria (Alex), and grandchildren John, Antonios and Christina.

 


 

Baby Blessing

 

Parents Christina (Tina) and Shane Grabski and proud big brother Shane Ioannis present Mia Konstantina for the traditional 40 day blessing.

 


 

Schedule of Church Services

  • 1/24  Sunday:                                                         9am/10am          Orthros/Divine Liturgy

Also, we are live streaming our services.

Visit https://stdemetrios.org/ where a link to the broadcast will be found.

 


 

Stewardship

 

“…The Greatest Of These Is Love” 1 Cor 13:13

We ask you to support the worship, service and activities of St. Demetrios Church. Giving to His Church is a way to thank God for His grace, His generosity and His many blessings. Let’s Step Up our gifts of Time Talent and Treasure!

Please fill out a pledge form by either visiting https://stdemetrios.org/our-parish/stewardship/stewardship-form/ or downloading this form.  You can make contributions towards your financial pledge by visiting https://stdemetrios.org/make-a-donation/ .

Thank you!


 

Announcements

 

Sunday School News

  • Oratorical Festival

The St. Demetrios Oratorical Festival is set for Sunday, March 21. The event will take place after liturgy in the church. To learn more, students and parents may contact James W. Carras at jameswcarras@gmail.com. Below are the topics. Visit https://www.goarch.org/en/oratorical for tips and resources on the topics, the rules, the various scholarship opportunities, and the Metropolis level and Archdiocese level dates.

Junior Division (Grades 7–9) Topics

1. Discuss the challenges and opportunities of watching a church service that is live streamed.
2. Prayer is called a “conversation with God.” Discuss the meaning of prayer in your life.
3. During the pandemic, people noticed that our natural environment became cleaner. What can this teach us about our care for the natural world?
4. Why is the Church still relevant, especially for young people, in our increasingly secular, post-COVID world?
5. Choose one parable from the Gospel of Luke chapters 15 or 16 that is particularly meaningful to you and explain what we can learn from it.

Senior Division (Grades 10–12) Topics

1. During the stay at home period of the pandemic, Orthodox Christians had to find ways to practice their faith without attending church in person or participating in parish activities. Discuss what you learned during those days.
2. In July 2020, a Turkish court gave permission for Hagia Sophia to be converted from a museum into a mosque. Discuss the significance of Hagia Sophia in the history of Christianity and the power of monuments like it to inspire religious identity.
3. We live in a highly polarized society – left vs. right, personal liberty vs. common good, and other issues where it seems everything is politicized. How are we as Orthodox Christians called to navigate this environment?
4. St. Peter writes, “Live as free men, yet without using your freedom as a pretext for evil; but live as servants of God.” (1 Peter 2:16). What is freedom and how does it become a basis for being a servant?
5. In the Psalms we read, “If you, Lord, should mark iniquities, Lord, who could stand? But there is forgiveness with you.” (Psalm 130:3-4, NRSV). Discuss how an Orthodox Christian understands sin, forgiveness, mercy, and repentance.


 

Philoptochos News

  • Thanking Healthcare Workers

See the details below. If you would like to help us reach out, visit https://ladies-philoptochos-of-st-demetrios.square.site/

  • St. Basil’s Academy

St. Basil’s Academy in Garrison, New York, has been a mission of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese since 1944, caring for orphans and children whose parents are ill or who can’t care for them.  Every year Philoptochos offers the Vasilopita on behalf of those children.  This year there will be a special basket in church.  If you cannot come to church, please consider supporting St. Basil’s with a check to Philoptochos, 820 NE 14th Avenue, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, 33304, or online at https://ladies-philoptochos-of-st-demetrios.square.site/

 

  • Membership          

Dear Ladies of St. Demetrios,
This has been a year like none other.  Many of us and our loved ones have faced illness, unemployment, and loneliness.  And yet the women of St. Demetrios have reached out to fill our spiritual, material, and emotional needs. It was women, through the Ladies Philoptochos, St. Elpis (Hope) chapter, who called to check on parishioners, got food and money to families who were suddenly unemployed, called and sent cards to the sick, reached out to our young people, and donated to the needs of greater Ft. Lauderdale. But our patron St. Elpis wasn’t alone.  She was the daughter of Sophia (Wisdom) and the sister of Pistis (Faith) and Agape (Love).  To continue its work, Philoptochos needs ALL the wisdom, hope, faith, and love of ALL the women of St. Demetrios.
Please use the form below to join or renew for 2021.

 


 

Daughters of Penelope News

 

  • Membership Drive

We would love to have you join our wonderful Chapter!!  Our next initiation will be in January 2021.  Please contact Erin Ryan at 954 683-6452 or eryan75@gmail.com.

 

  • Valentines Bingo

 



Light a Candle & Say a Prayer at Saint Demetrios

 

“It is impossible to imagine an Orthodox church in which candles are not lit.”
(Blessed Simeon of Thessalonica, 15th Century) 

 

“I am the light of the world; he who follows me will not walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.” (John 8:12) 

We know that at this time it can be difficult to pray from home and not physically be in the church. One of the first things most people do upon entering an Orthodox Church is to light their candle and offer prayers for one’s personal needs or that of a family member or friend, we also light candles to pray for protection and safety so that we may live this life without fear.

If you wish to light a candle, visit https://saintdemetrios.square.site After you select the candle(s) that you would like us to light and before pressing the “Place Order” button, please submit the names of your loved ones, those who are alive and/or those who have departed this life. During these times we would be happy to light the candle for you and read the names that have been submitted during the Divine Liturgy.

 


 

Dear St. Demetrios Family,

St. Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church, Ft. Lauderdale is open to the faithful.  We are complying with all CDC, State, Local and Archdiocese guidelines.  Here is the list of things that will be taking place on Sundays.

1)  Everyone must wear a mask in order to enter the church.
2)  Before entering the church, the temperature of each person will be taken by a designated person. If the person’s temperature is above 100.4 F he or she will be kindly asked to return to their home, both for their safety and the safety of others.
3) Parish Council will direct each parishioner to the designated X in the pews for each person or household to sit starting in the front of the church and working their way to back.
4) A place to accept offerings will be provided in the Narthex upon entering or leaving.
5) Parishioners are not to move around the church during the services to light candles or venerate icons.
6) Names and phone numbers of each attendee at every service will be taken in the event that a subsequent infection requires tracing.
7) If you have any symptoms of coronavirus, COVID-19 (fever, cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, chills, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat, new loss of taste or smell), you must NOT attend church, and immediately seek medical attention for yourself and your household.
8) Parishioners who are at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19 as defined by civil authorities are given dispensation not to attend services and will be asked to refrain from attending.
9) In terms of preventing the spread of this virus, we ask parishioners to follow CDC directives, which currently include: washing of hands thoroughly and frequently, covering your coughs and sneezes, avoiding sharing personal items, wearing a mask, and maintaining a social distance of six feet.
10) Honor is to be shown to Holy Icons and the Holy Cross by only doing your cross and bowing, keeping in mind not to kiss or to touch the Holy Icons and the Holy Cross.
11) No one is to enter the Holy Altar except the clergy and assigned adult helpers.
12) For Memorials, please write the names of your deceased for the clergy to pray for their souls (without Koliva).
13) Artoclasias will be celebrated as normal.
14) No service books will be left out for common use. This includes papers of any kind (bulletins etc.). Parishioners are encouraged to bring their own service books.
15) During Holy Communion – Communicants must line up row by row (with help from Parish Council) and remain six feet apart using the designated social distancing X’s that have been placed in the church.  Communicants may remove their masks only momentarily to receive Holy Communion.
16)  For the continued safety of those attending church services in person, parishioners should immediately leave when the service is finished. For the sake of others, please do not socialize in the Narthex or other areas of the church or its surrounding buildings or parking lots. Additionally, Sunday Coffee Fellowship hours will be suspended until further notice.

Yours In Christ,
Fr. Peter Zougras

 

 

 

 

The Liturgical Guide and Bulletin for Sunday, January 17, 2021

 


 

January 17, 2021 ~ 12th Sunday of Luke

 

 

Anthony the Great
Commemorated on January 17

 

Saint Anthony, the Father of monks, was born in Egypt in 251 of pious parents who departed this life while he was yet young. On hearing the words of the Gospel: “If thou wilt be perfect, go and sell what thou hast, and give to the poor” (Matt. 19:21), he immediately put it into action. Distributing to the poor all he had, and fleeing from all the turmoil of the world, he departed to the desert. The manifold temptations he endured continually for the span of twenty years are incredible. His ascetic struggles by day and by night, whereby he mortified the uprisings of the passions and attained to the height of dispassion, surpass the bounds of nature; and the report of his deeds of virtue drew such a multitude to follow him that the desert was transformed into a city, while he became, so to speak, the governor, lawgiver, and master-trainer of all the citizens of this newly-formed city.

The cities of the world also enjoyed the fruit of his virtue. When the Christians were being persecuted and put to death under Maximinus in 312, he hastened to their aid and consolation. When the Church was troubled by the Arians, he went with zeal to Alexandria in 335 and struggled against them in behalf of Orthodoxy. During this time, by the grace of his words, he also turned many unbelievers to Christ.

Saint Anthony began his ascetic life outside his village of Coma in Upper Egypt, studying the ways of the ascetics and holy men there, and perfecting himself in the virtues of each until he surpassed them all. Desiring to increase his labors, he departed into the desert, and finding an abandoned fortress in the mountain, he made his dwelling in it, training himself in extreme fasting, unceasing prayer, and fierce conflicts with the demons. Here he remained, as mentioned above, about twenty years. Saint Athanasius the Great, who knew him personally and wrote his life, says that he came forth from that fortress “initiated in the mysteries and filled with the Spirit of God.” Afterwards, because of the press of the faithful, who deprived him of his solitude, he was enlightened by God to journey with certain Bedouins, until he came to a mountain in the desert near the Red Sea, where he passed the remaining part of his life.

Saint Athanasius says of him that “his countenance had a great and wonderful grace. This gift also he had from the Saviour. For if he were present in a great company of monks, and any one who did not know him previously wished to see him, immediately coming forward he passed by the rest, and hurried to Anthony, as though attracted by his appearance. Yet neither in height nor breadth was he conspicuous above others, but in the serenity of his manner and the purity of his soul.” So Passing his life, and becoming an example of virtue and a rule for monastics, he reposed on January 17 in the year 356, having lived altogether some 105 years

 


 

Liturgical Guide

 

Resurrectional Apolytikion in the Grave Mode
Κατλυσας τ Σταυρ σου τν θνατον…
Thou didst abolish death by Thy Cross; Thou didst open Paradise to the thief; Thou didst transform the myrrh-bearers’ lamentation, and didst bid Thine Apostles to preach that Thou art risen, O Christ God, granting great mercy to the world.

Apolytikion for Anthony the Great in the Fourth Mode
Τν ζηλωτν λαν τος τρποις μιμομενος…
Emulating the ways of Elias the zealot, and following the straight paths of the Baptist, O Father Anthony, thou madest of the wilderness a city, and didst support the world by thy prayers. Wherefore intercede with Christ our God that our souls be saved.

Apolytikion of St. Demetrios in the Third Mode
Μέγαν εύρατο εv τοίς κιvδύvοις …
Greatness has been found in danger.  You are champion of the world.  A victor who could turn the nations back.  You boldly encouraged Nestor to defeat Lyaeus in the arena.  Therefore, holy great martyr Demetrios, intercede with Christ our God, to grant us His great mercy.

Seasonal Kontakion in the First Mode 
μτραν παρθενικν γισας τ τκω σου…
Your birth sanctified a Virgin’s womb and properly blessed the hands of Symeon. Having now come and saved us O Christ our God, give peace to Your commonwealth in troubled times and strengthen those in authority, whom You love, as only the loving One.

Prokeimenon. Grave Mode. Psalm 115.15,12. 
Precious in the sight of the Lord is the death of his saints.
Verse: What shall I render to the Lord for all that he has given me?

The reading is from St. Paul’s Letter to the Hebrews 13:17-21.

Brethren, obey your leaders and submit to them; for they are keeping watch over your souls, as men who will have to give account. Let them do this joyfully, and not sadly, for that would be of no advantage to you. Pray for us, for we are sure that we have a clear conscience, desiring to act honorably in all things. I urge you the more earnestly to do this in order that I may be restored to you the sooner. Now may the God of peace who brought again from the dead our Lord Jesus, the great Shepherd of the sheep, by the blood of the eternal covenant, equip you with everything good that you may do His will, working in you that which is pleasing in His sight, through Jesus Christ; to whom be glory for ever and ever. Amen.
The Reading is from Luke 17:12-19

At that time, as Jesus entered a village, he was met by ten lepers, who stood at a distance and lifted up their voices and said: “Jesus, Master, have mercy on us.” When he saw them he said to them, “Go and show yourselves to the priests.” And as they went they were cleansed. Then one of them, when he saw that he was healed, turned back, praising God with a loud voice; and he fell on his face at Jesus’s feet, giving him thanks. Now he was a Samaritan. Then said Jesus: “Were not ten cleansed? Where are the nine? Was no one found to return and give praise to God except this foreigner?” And he said to him: “Rise and go your way; your faith has made you well.”

 



Memorial Prayer

 

Gari Paticopoulos (5 days) beloved longtime parishioner of St. Demetrios Church.

Joakim Joanides (1 year) survived by his wife Marigo, daughter Joanna, grandson Constantinos, and sister in law Athena Loucas.

Sofia Glantzis (2 years) survived by her husband Philipp, son Nikolaos, daughter in law Tania, and granddaughter Stefania.

Georgia Retsinas (2 years) survived by her husband Johny Kountouridis and her children Matheo and Thalia.

George Stringos (2 years) survived by his wife Angeliki, sons Emanuel and George (Tracey) and grandson George.

Dimitrios Gigiras (4 years) survived by her daughters Evagelia and Jane, granchildren and a great granddaughter.

Helen Harris (5 years) mother of Dawne Richards.

Galatea Psonis (6 years) survived by her daughter Galatea, and nieces and nephews Denis, Connie, John, Thalia, Katherine, and Sharon.

 

Trisagion Prayer

 

Nicholas Demiris (3 months) beloved son of Kalliopi Hanlon, brother of Chris and Harry.

Demetrios Kapakos (32 years) survived by his children Chris, Vola and Effie and by his grandchildren James and Sara.

Emanuel, Kyriakoula, Anna, Antonios survived by Angeliki Stringos.


 

Schedule of Church Services

  • 1/17  Sunday:                                                         9am/10am          Orthros/Divine Liturgy

Also, we are live streaming our services.

Visit https://stdemetrios.org/ where a link to the broadcast will be found.

 


 

Stewardship

“…The Greatest Of These Is Love” 1 Cor 13:13

We ask you to support the worship, service and activities of St. Demetrios Church. Giving to His Church is a way to thank God for His grace, His generosity and His many blessings. Let’s Step Up our gifts of Time Talent and Treasure!
Please fill out a pledge form by either visiting https://stdemetrios.org/our-parish/stewardship/stewardship-form/ or downloading this form.  You can make contributions towards your financial pledge by visiting https://stdemetrios.org/make-a-donation/ .

Thank you!


 

Announcements

 

Clean Up Day

Come for a cleanup day at church on Saturday, January 23 at 9:00am.  We will clean up the landscaping and we will organize the area behind the kitchen.  Bring your tools and gloves!

 


 

Philoptochos News

 

  • St. Basil’s Academy

St. Basil’s Academy in Garrison, New York, has been a mission of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese since 1944, caring for orphans and children whose parents are ill or who can’t care for them.  Every year Philoptochos offers the Vasilopita on behalf of those children.  This year there will be a special basket in church.  If you cannot come to church, please consider supporting St. Basil’s with a check to Philoptochos, 820 NE 14th Avenue, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, 33304, or online at https://ladies-philoptochos-of-st-demetrios.square.site/

 

  • Membership          

Dear Ladies of St. Demetrios,
This has been a year like none other.  Many of us and our loved ones have faced illness, unemployment, and loneliness.  And yet the women of St. Demetrios have reached out to fill our spiritual, material, and emotional needs. It was women, through the Ladies Philoptochos, St. Elpis (Hope) chapter, who called to check on parishioners, got food and money to families who were suddenly unemployed, called and sent cards to the sick, reached out to our young people, and donated to the needs of greater Ft. Lauderdale. But our patron St. Elpis wasn’t alone.  She was the daughter of Sophia (Wisdom) and the sister of Pistis (Faith) and Agape (Love).  To continue its work, Philoptochos needs ALL the wisdom, hope, faith, and love of ALL the women of St. Demetrios.
Please use the form below to join or renew for 2021.

 


 

Daughters of Penelope News

 

  • Membership Drive

We would love to have you join our wonderful Chapter!!  Our next initiation will be in January 2021.  Please contact Erin Ryan at 954 683-6452 or eryan75@gmail.com.

 

  • Valentines Bingo

 



Light a Candle & Say a Prayer at Saint Demetrios

“It is impossible to imagine an Orthodox church in which candles are not lit.”
(Blessed Simeon of Thessalonica, 15th Century) 

“I am the light of the world; he who follows me will not walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.” (John 8:12) 

We know that at this time it can be difficult to pray from home and not physically be in the church. One of the first things most people do upon entering an Orthodox Church is to light their candle and offer prayers for one’s personal needs or that of a family member or friend, we also light candles to pray for protection and safety so that we may live this life without fear.

If you wish to light a candle, visit https://saintdemetrios.square.site After you select the candle(s) that you would like us to light and before pressing the “Place Order” button, please submit the names of your loved ones, those who are alive and/or those who have departed this life. During these times we would be happy to light the candle for you and read the names that have been submitted during the Divine Liturgy.

 


 

Dear St. Demetrios Family,

St. Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church, Ft. Lauderdale is open to the faithful.  We are complying with all CDC, State, Local and Archdiocese guidelines.  Here is the list of things that will be taking place on Sundays.

1)  Everyone must wear a mask in order to enter the church.
2)  Before entering the church, the temperature of each person will be taken by a designated person. If the person’s temperature is above 100.4 F he or she will be kindly asked to return to their home, both for their safety and the safety of others.
3) Parish Council will direct each parishioner to the designated X in the pews for each person or household to sit starting in the front of the church and working their way to back.
4) A place to accept offerings will be provided in the Narthex upon entering or leaving.
5) Parishioners are not to move around the church during the services to light candles or venerate icons.
6) Names and phone numbers of each attendee at every service will be taken in the event that a subsequent infection requires tracing.
7) If you have any symptoms of coronavirus, COVID-19 (fever, cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, chills, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat, new loss of taste or smell), you must NOT attend church, and immediately seek medical attention for yourself and your household.
8) Parishioners who are at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19 as defined by civil authorities are given dispensation not to attend services and will be asked to refrain from attending.
9) In terms of preventing the spread of this virus, we ask parishioners to follow CDC directives, which currently include: washing of hands thoroughly and frequently, covering your coughs and sneezes, avoiding sharing personal items, wearing a mask, and maintaining a social distance of six feet.
10) Honor is to be shown to Holy Icons and the Holy Cross by only doing your cross and bowing, keeping in mind not to kiss or to touch the Holy Icons and the Holy Cross.
11) No one is to enter the Holy Altar except the clergy and assigned adult helpers.
12) For Memorials, please write the names of your deceased for the clergy to pray for their souls (without Koliva).
13) Artoclasias will be celebrated as normal.
14) No service books will be left out for common use. This includes papers of any kind (bulletins etc.). Parishioners are encouraged to bring their own service books.
15) During Holy Communion – Communicants must line up row by row (with help from Parish Council) and remain six feet apart using the designated social distancing X’s that have been placed in the church.  Communicants may remove their masks only momentarily to receive Holy Communion.
16)  For the continued safety of those attending church services in person, parishioners should immediately leave when the service is finished. For the sake of others, please do not socialize in the Narthex or other areas of the church or its surrounding buildings or parking lots. Additionally, Sunday Coffee Fellowship hours will be suspended until further notice.

Yours In Christ,
Fr. Peter Zougras

 

 

 

 

The Liturgical Guide and Bulletin for Sunday, January 10, 2021

 


 

January 10, 2021 ~ Sunday after Theophany

 

 

Dometian, Bishop of Melitene
Commemorated on January 10

 

Saint Dometian lived in the years of the Emperor Justin II, who reigned from 565 to 578, and the Emperor Maurice, who reigned from 582 to 602. Born of pious parents named Theodore and Eudocia, he received a thorough education in both secular and sacred knowledge. After he had lived in lawful wedlock a short time, his wife died, and he, for his virtue was made Bishop of Melitene in Armenia at the age of thirty. As a kinsman and trusted friend of the Emperor Maurice, he received from him great largesse, which he spent on the building of churches and the help of the poor; he was entrusted with the dealings of Byzantium with Persia. While in Constantinople, he reposed in peace in the year 602.

 

 

Theosebia the Deaconess, sister of Basil the Great & Gregory of Nyssa
Commemorated on January 10

 

Saint Theosebia the Deaconess was the sister of Saints Basil the Great, Gregory of Nyssa, and Peter, Bishop of Sebaste. She served the Holy Church as a deaconess, caring for the sick, distributing food to vagrants, raising orphans and preparing women for holy Baptism. When her brother, Saint Gregory of Nyssa, was in exile for three years, Saint Theosebia was with him and she shared in all the tribulations of a life of wandering. Saint Theosebia died in 385, and Saint Gregory the Theologian praised her in a eulogy.

Saint Gregory, the younger brother of Basil the Great, illustrious in speech and a zealot for the Orthodox Faith, was born in 331. His brother Basil was encouraged by their elder sister Macrina to prefer the service of God to a secular career (see July 19); Saint Gregory was moved in a similar way by his godly mother Emily, who, when Gregory was still a young man, implored him to attend a service in honor of the holy Forty Martyrs at her retreat at Annesi on the River Iris. Saint Gregory came at his mother’s bidding, but being wearied with the journey, and feeling little zeal, he fell asleep during the service. The Forty Martyrs then appeared to him in a dream, threatening him and reproaching him for his slothfulness. After this he repented and became very diligent in the service of God.  Gregory became bishop in 372, and because of his Orthodoxy he was exiled in 374 by Valens, who was of one mind with the Arians. After the death of Valens in 378, Gregory was recalled to his throne by the Emperor Gratian. He attended the Local Council of Antioch, which sent him to visit the churches of Arabia and Palestine, which had been defiled and ravaged by Arianism. He attended the Second Ecumenical Council, which was assembled in Constantinople in 381. Having lived some sixty years and left behind many remarkable writings, he reposed about the year 395. The acts of the Seventh Ecumenical Council call him ‘Father of Fathers.”  Saint Gregory is commemorated on January 10.

 


 

Liturgical Guide

 

Resurrectional Apolytikion in the Plagal Second Mode
γγελικα Δυνμεις π τ μνμ σου…
Angelic powers were above Thy tomb, and they that guarded Thee became as dead. And Mary stood by the grave seeking Thine immaculate Body. Thou hast despoiled Hades and wast not tried thereby. Thou didst meet the Virgin and didst grant us life. O Thou Who didst arise from the dead, Lord, glory be to Thee.

Apolytikion for Theophany Afterfeast in the First Mode
ν ορδν βαπτιζομνου σου Κριε…
When Thou wast baptized in the Jordan, O Lord, the worship of the Trinity was made manifest; for the voice of the Father bare witness to Thee, calling Thee His beloved Son. And the Spirit in the form of a dove confirmed the certainty of the word. O Christ our God, Who hast appeared and hast enlightened the world, glory be to Thee.

Apolytikion of St. Demetrios in the Third Mode
Μέγαν εύρατο εv τοίς κιvδύvοις …
Greatness has been found in danger.  You are champion of the world.  A victor who could turn the nations back.  You boldly encouraged Nestor to defeat Lyaeus in the arena.  Therefore, holy great martyr Demetrios, intercede with Christ our God, to grant us His great mercy.

Seasonal Kontakion in the Fourth Mode 
πεφνης σμερον τ οκουμνη…
You appeared to the world today, and Your light, O Lord, has left its mark upon us. With fuller understanding we sing to You: “You came, You were made manifest, the unapproachable light.”

 

Prokeimenon. First Mode. Psalm 32.22,1. 
Let your mercy, O Lord, be upon us.
Verse: Rejoice in the Lord, O ye righteous.

 

The reading is from St. Paul’s Letter to the Ephesians 4:7-13.

BRETHREN, grace was given to each of us according to the measure of Christ’s gift. Therefore it is said, “When he ascended on high he led a host of captives, and he gave gifts to men.” (in saying, “He ascended,” what does it mean but that he had also descended into the lower parts of the earth? He who descended is he who also ascended far above all the heavens, that he might fill all things.) And his gifts were that some should be apostles, some prophets, some evangelists, some pastors and teachers, to equip the saints for the work of ministry, for building up the body of Christ, until we all attain to the unity of the faith and of the knowledge of the Son of God, to mature manhood, to the measure of the stature of the fullness of Christ.
The Reading is from Matthew 4:12-17

At that time, when Jesus heard that John had been arrested, he withdrew into Galilee; and leaving Nazareth he went and dwelt in Capernaum by the sea, in the territory of Zebulun and Naphtali, that what was spoken by the prophet Isaiah might be fulfilled: “The land of Zebulun and the land of Naphtali, toward the sea, across the Jordan, Galilee of the Gentiles, the people who sat in darkness have seen a great light, and for those who sat in the region and shadow of death light has dawned.” From that time Jesus began to preach, saying, “Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand.”

 


 

Memorial Prayer

 

Mitchel James Thermis (7 days) survived by his wife Loretta, son Albert, sister Sophia Thermis, and 5 generations of nieces and nephews.

Katherine Hampares (6 months) survived by long time friend Dr. Nelly Santos and son Alex.

 

Trisagion Prayer

 

Paul Bisbikos (7 years) beloved choir member of St. Demetrios Church.  Survived by his daughter Paula Michelle Bisbikos Dodge and by his grandsons.

Orlando Haralambos Perez (7 years) survived by wife Evelyn, daughter Nicole, and stepson Michael.

Constantine Anastasiou (17 years) survived by wife Toni, sons Jason and Fr Savvas, grandchildren Fotini, Antonios and Isabella.

 


 

Schedule of Church Services

  • 1/10 Sunday:                                                          9am/10am          Orthros/Divine Liturgy

Also, we are live streaming our services.

Visit https://stdemetrios.org/ where a link to the broadcast will be found.

 


 

Announcements

 

GOYA

Help is needed! Everyone in the family is invited to join.  *Masks are mandatory.

 


 

Clean Up Day

Come for a cleanup day at church on Saturday, January 23 at 9:00am.  We will clean up the landscaping and we will organize the area behind the kitchen.  Bring your tools and gloves!

 


 

Philoptochos News

 

  • St. Basil’s Academy

St. Basil’s Academy in Garrison, New York, has been a mission of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese since 1944, caring for orphans and children whose parents are ill or who can’t care for them.  Every year Philoptochos offers the Vasilopita on behalf of those children.  This year there will be a special basket in church.  If you cannot come to church, please consider supporting St. Basil’s with a check to Philoptochos, 820 NE 14th Avenue, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, 33304, or online at https://ladies-philoptochos-of-st-demetrios.square.site/

 

Here are some photos of last Sunday’s cutting of the Vasilopita:

 

 

  • Membership          

Dear Ladies of St. Demetrios,
This has been a year like none other.  Many of us and our loved ones have faced illness, unemployment, and loneliness.  And yet the women of St. Demetrios have reached out to fill our spiritual, material, and emotional needs. It was women, through the Ladies Philoptochos, St. Elpis (Hope) chapter, who called to check on parishioners, got food and money to families who were suddenly unemployed, called and sent cards to the sick, reached out to our young people, and donated to the needs of greater Ft. Lauderdale.
But our patron St. Elpis wasn’t alone.  She was the daughter of Sophia (Wisdom) and the sister of Pistis (Faith) and Agape (Love).  To continue its work, Philoptochos needs ALL the wisdom, hope, faith, and love of ALL the women of St. Demetrios.
Please use the form below to join or renew for 2021.

 


 

Daughters of Penelope News

 

  • Meeting

Daughters of Penelope will hold their virtual meeting via Zoom on Wednesday January 13th at 7:30 pm.

 

  • Membership Drive

We would love to have you join our wonderful Chapter!!  Our next initiation will be in January 2021.  Please contact Erin Ryan at 954 683-6452 or eryan75@gmail.com.

 

  • Valentines Bingo

 



Light a Candle & Say a Prayer at Saint Demetrios

“It is impossible to imagine an Orthodox church in which candles are not lit.”
(Blessed Simeon of Thessalonica, 15th Century) 

“I am the light of the world; he who follows me will not walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.” (John 8:12) 

We know that at this time it can be difficult to pray from home and not physically be in the church. One of the first things most people do upon entering an Orthodox Church is to light their candle and offer prayers for one’s personal needs or that of a family member or friend, we also light candles to pray for protection and safety so that we may live this life without fear.

If you wish to light a candle, visit https://saintdemetrios.square.site After you select the candle(s) that you would like us to light and before pressing the “Place Order” button, please submit the names of your loved ones, those who are alive and/or those who have departed this life. During these times we would be happy to light the candle for you and read the names that have been submitted during the Divine Liturgy.

 


 

Dear St. Demetrios Family,

St. Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church, Ft. Lauderdale is open to the faithful.  We are complying with all CDC, State, Local and Archdiocese guidelines.  Here is the list of things that will be taking place on Sundays.

1)  Everyone must wear a mask in order to enter the church.
2)  Before entering the church, the temperature of each person will be taken by a designated person. If the person’s temperature is above 100.4 F he or she will be kindly asked to return to their home, both for their safety and the safety of others.
3) Parish Council will direct each parishioner to the designated X in the pews for each person or household to sit starting in the front of the church and working their way to back.
4) A place to accept offerings will be provided in the Narthex upon entering or leaving.
5) Parishioners are not to move around the church during the services to light candles or venerate icons.
6) Names and phone numbers of each attendee at every service will be taken in the event that a subsequent infection requires tracing.
7) If you have any symptoms of coronavirus, COVID-19 (fever, cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, chills, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat, new loss of taste or smell), you must NOT attend church, and immediately seek medical attention for yourself and your household.
8) Parishioners who are at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19 as defined by civil authorities are given dispensation not to attend services and will be asked to refrain from attending.
9) In terms of preventing the spread of this virus, we ask parishioners to follow CDC directives, which currently include: washing of hands thoroughly and frequently, covering your coughs and sneezes, avoiding sharing personal items, wearing a mask, and maintaining a social distance of six feet.
10) Honor is to be shown to Holy Icons and the Holy Cross by only doing your cross and bowing, keeping in mind not to kiss or to touch the Holy Icons and the Holy Cross.
11) No one is to enter the Holy Altar except the clergy and assigned adult helpers.
12) For Memorials, please write the names of your deceased for the clergy to pray for their souls (without Koliva).
13) Artoclasias will be celebrated as normal.
14) No service books will be left out for common use. This includes papers of any kind (bulletins etc.). Parishioners are encouraged to bring their own service books.
15) During Holy Communion – Communicants must line up row by row (with help from Parish Council) and remain six feet apart using the designated social distancing X’s that have been placed in the church.  Communicants may remove their masks only momentarily to receive Holy Communion.
16)  For the continued safety of those attending church services in person, parishioners should immediately leave when the service is finished. For the sake of others, please do not socialize in the Narthex or other areas of the church or its surrounding buildings or parking lots. Additionally, Sunday Coffee Fellowship hours will be suspended until further notice.

Yours In Christ,
Fr. Peter Zougras

 

 

 

 

The Liturgical Guide and Bulletin for Sunday, January 3, 2021

 


 

Upcoming Liturgical Services

 

  • 1/1 Friday–                     Feast of St. Basil the Great:               9am/10am                   Orthros/Divine Liturgy
  • 1/3 Sunday:                                                                               9am/10am                    Orthros/Divine Liturgy
  • 1/6 Wednesday–            Holy Theophany:                                9am/10am                    Orthros/Divine Liturgy/Blessing of the water

 


 

January 3, 2021 ~ Sunday before Theophany

 

 

Righteous Genevieve of Paris
Commemorated on January 3

 

Saint Genevieve was born of wealthy parents in Gaul (modern France) in the village of Nanterre, near Paris, around 422. Her father’s name was Severus, and her mother was called Gerontia. According to the custom of the time, she often tended her father’s flocks on Mt. Valerien.

When she was about seven years old, Saint Germanus of Auxerre (July 31) noticed her as he was passing through Nanterre. The bishop kissed her on the head and told her parents that she would become great in the sight of God, and would lead many to salvation. After Genevieve told him that she wished to dedicate herself to Christ, he gave her a brass medal with the image of the Cross upon it. She promised to wear it around her neck, and to avoid wearing any other ornaments around her neck or on her fingers.

When it was reported that Attila the Hun was approaching Paris, Genevieve and the other nuns prayed and fasted, entreating God to spare the city. Suddenly, the barbarians turned away from Paris and went off in another direction.

Years later, when she was fifteen, Genevieve was taken to Paris to enter the monastic life. Through fasting, vigil and prayer, she progressed in monasticism, and received from God the gifts of clairvoyance and of working miracles. Gradually, the people of Paris and the surrounding area regarded Genevieve as a holy vessel (2 Tim. 2:21).

Saint Genevieve considered the Saturday night Vigil service to be very important, since it symbolizes how our whole life should be. “We must keep vigil in prayer and fasting so that the Lord will find us ready when He comes,” she said. She was on her way to church with her nuns one stormy Saturday night when the wind blew out her lantern. The nuns could not find their way without a light, since it was dark and stormy, and the road was rough and muddy. Saint Genevieve made the Sign of the Cross over the lantern, and the candle within was lit with a bright flame. In this manner they were able to make their way to the church for the service.

There is a tradition that the church which Saint Genevieve suggested that King Clovis build in honor of Saints Peter and Paul became her own resting place when she fell asleep in the Lord around 512 at the age of eighty-nine. Her holy relics were later transferred to the church of Saint Etienne du Mont in Paris. Most of her relics, and those of other saints, were destroyed during the French Revolution.

 


 

Liturgical Guide

 

Resurrectional Apolytikion in the First Mode
Τν συνναρχον Λγον Πατρ κα Πνεματι…
Let us worship the Word, O ye faithful, praising Him that with the Father and the Spirit is co-beginningless God, Who was born of a pure Virgin that we all be saved; for He was pleased to mount the Cross in the flesh that He assumed, accepting thus to endure death. And by His glorious rising, He also willed to resurrect the dead.

Apolytikion for the Forefeast of the Theophany in the Fourth Mode
τοιμζου Ζαβουλν, κα ετρεπζου Νεφθαλεμ…
Be thou ready, Zabulon; prepare thyself, O Nephthalim. River Jordan, stay thy course and skip for gladness to receive the Sovereign Master, Who cometh now to be baptized. O Adam, be thou glad with our first mother, Eve; hide not as ye did of old in Paradise. Seeing you naked, He hath appeared now to clothe you in the first robe again. Christ hath appeared, for He truly willeth to renew all creation.

Apolytikion of St. Demetrios in the Third Mode
Μέγαν εύρατο εv τοίς κιvδύvοις …
Greatness has been found in danger.  You are champion of the world.  A victor who could turn the nations back.  You boldly encouraged Nestor to defeat Lyaeus in the arena.  Therefore, holy great martyr Demetrios, intercede with Christ our God, to grant us His great mercy.

Seasonal Kontakion in the Fourth Mode 
ν τος εθροις σμερον το ορδνου…
In the running waters of the Jordan River, on this day the Lord of all crieth to John: Be not afraid and hesitate not to baptize Me, for I am come to save Adam, the first-formed man.

Prokeimenon. Plagal Second Mode. Psalm 27.9,1. 
O Lord, save your people and bless your inheritance.
Verse: To you, O Lord, I have cried, O my God.

 

The reading is from St. Paul’s Second Letter to Timothy 4:5-8.

TIMOTHY, my son, always be steady, endure suffering, do the work of an evangelist, fulfil your ministry.

For I am already on the point of being sacrificed; the time of my departure has come. I have fought the good fight, I have finished the race, I have kept the faith. Henceforth there is laid up for me the crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous judge, will award to me on that Day, and not only to me but also to all who have loved his appearing.
The Reading is from Mark 1:1-8

The beginning of the Gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God. As it is written in the prophets, ‘Behold, I send my messenger before your face, who shall prepare your way; the voice of one crying in the wilderness: prepare the way of the Lord, make his paths straight.’ John was baptizing in the wilderness, preaching a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins. And there went out to him all the country of Judea, and all the people of Jerusalem; and they were baptized by him in the river Jordan, confessing their sins. Now John was clothed with camel’s hair, and had a leather girdle around his waist, and ate locusts and wild honey. And he preached, saying, “After me comes he who is mightier than I, the thong of whose sandals I am not worthy to stoop down and untie. I have baptized you with water; but he will baptize you with the Holy Spirit.”


 

Memorial Prayer

 

Mark Hatzikostantis (1 year) survived by his wife Dina, his children, and his grandchildren.

Venetia Alexakis (6 years) survived by her daughter Eleni Degelsmith, and by her grandsons Alex and James Degelsmith.

Alex Argiropoulos (14 years) survived by his parents Monica and John, his siblings Kyriakos (Erin), Daniella and Monique, his niece Alexa, and his nephew Yianni.

 


 

Schedule of Church Services

  • 1/1 Friday–                     Feast of St. Basil the Great:               9am/10am                   Orthros/Divine Liturgy
  • 1/3 Sunday:                                                                               9am/10am                    Orthros/Divine Liturgy
  • 1/6 Wednesday–            Holy Theophany:                                9am/10am                    Orthros/Divine Liturgy/Blessing of the water

Also, we are live streaming our services.
Visit https://stdemetrios.org/ where a link to the broadcast will be found.

 


 

Announcements

 

Clean Up Day

Come for a cleanup day at church on Saturday, January 23 at 9:00am.  We will clean up the landscaping and we will organize the area behind the kitchen.  Bring your tools and gloves!

 

Philoptochos News

 

  • St. Basil’s Academy

St. Basil’s Academy in Garrison, New York, has been a mission of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese since 1944, caring for orphans and children whose parents are ill or who can’t care for them.  Every year Philoptochos offers the Vasilopita on behalf of those children.  This year there will be a special basket in church.  If you cannot come to church, please consider supporting St. Basil’s with a check to Philoptochos, 820 NE 14th Avenue, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, 33304, or online at https://ladies-philoptochos-of-st-demetrios.square.site/

 

  • Membership          

Dear Ladies of St. Demetrios,
This has been a year like none other.  Many of us and our loved ones have faced illness, unemployment, and loneliness.  And yet the women of St. Demetrios have reached out to fill our spiritual, material, and emotional needs. It was women, through the Ladies Philoptochos, St. Elpis (Hope) chapter, who called to check on parishioners, got food and money to families who were suddenly unemployed, called and sent cards to the sick, reached out to our young people, and donated to the needs of greater Ft. Lauderdale.
But our patron St. Elpis wasn’t alone.  She was the daughter of Sophia (Wisdom) and the sister of Pistis (Faith) and Agape (Love).  To continue its work, Philoptochos needs ALL the wisdom, hope, faith, and love of ALL the women of St. Demetrios.
Please use the form below to join or renew for 2021.

 


 

Daughters of Penelope News

 

  • Membership Drive

 

We would love to have you join our wonderful Chapter!!  Our next initiation will be in January 2021.  Please contact Erin Ryan at 954 683-6452 or eryan75@gmail.com.

 


 

Light a Candle & Say a Prayer at Saint Demetrios

“It is impossible to imagine an Orthodox church in which candles are not lit.”
(Blessed Simeon of Thessalonica, 15th Century) 

“I am the light of the world; he who follows me will not walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.” (John 8:12) 

We know that at this time it can be difficult to pray from home and not physically be in the church. One of the first things most people do upon entering an Orthodox Church is to light their candle and offer prayers for one’s personal needs or that of a family member or friend, we also light candles to pray for protection and safety so that we may live this life without fear.

If you wish to light a candle, visit https://saintdemetrios.square.site After you select the candle(s) that you would like us to light and before pressing the “Place Order” button, please submit the names of your loved ones, those who are alive and/or those who have departed this life. During these times we would be happy to light the candle for you and read the names that have been submitted during the Divine Liturgy.

 


 

Dear St. Demetrios Family,

St. Demetrios Greek Orthodox Church, Ft. Lauderdale is open to the faithful.  We are complying with all CDC, State, Local and Archdiocese guidelines.  Here is the list of things that will be taking place on Sundays.

1)  Everyone must wear a mask in order to enter the church.
2)  Before entering the church, the temperature of each person will be taken by a designated person. If the person’s temperature is above 100.4 F he or she will be kindly asked to return to their home, both for their safety and the safety of others.
3) Parish Council will direct each parishioner to the designated X in the pews for each person or household to sit starting in the front of the church and working their way to back.
4) A place to accept offerings will be provided in the Narthex upon entering or leaving.
5) Parishioners are not to move around the church during the services to light candles or venerate icons.
6) Names and phone numbers of each attendee at every service will be taken in the event that a subsequent infection requires tracing.
7) If you have any symptoms of coronavirus, COVID-19 (fever, cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, chills, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat, new loss of taste or smell), you must NOT attend church, and immediately seek medical attention for yourself and your household.
8) Parishioners who are at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19 as defined by civil authorities are given dispensation not to attend services and will be asked to refrain from attending.
9) In terms of preventing the spread of this virus, we ask parishioners to follow CDC directives, which currently include: washing of hands thoroughly and frequently, covering your coughs and sneezes, avoiding sharing personal items, wearing a mask, and maintaining a social distance of six feet.
10) Honor is to be shown to Holy Icons and the Holy Cross by only doing your cross and bowing, keeping in mind not to kiss or to touch the Holy Icons and the Holy Cross.
11) No one is to enter the Holy Altar except the clergy and assigned adult helpers.
12) For Memorials, please write the names of your deceased for the clergy to pray for their souls (without Koliva).
13) Artoclasias will be celebrated as normal.
14) No service books will be left out for common use. This includes papers of any kind (bulletins etc.). Parishioners are encouraged to bring their own service books.
15) During Holy Communion – Communicants must line up row by row (with help from Parish Council) and remain six feet apart using the designated social distancing X’s that have been placed in the church.  Communicants may remove their masks only momentarily to receive Holy Communion.
16)  For the continued safety of those attending church services in person, parishioners should immediately leave when the service is finished. For the sake of others, please do not socialize in the Narthex or other areas of the church or its surrounding buildings or parking lots. Additionally, Sunday Coffee Fellowship hours will be suspended until further notice.

Yours In Christ,
Fr. Peter Zougras