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Weekly Sunday Bulletin – 16th Sunday of Matthew

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Kontakion in the Fourth Tone

O Priest-martyr, athlete, champion Haralambos, your relics are a priceless treasure of the Church. Wherefore she rejoices, glorifying the Creator.

Parish Council on duty:

Manny Daskos, George Georgakakis, Michael Haralambis, John Ioannou Jr., Delcho Ogorelkoff, Demetrios Rapanos, Kevin Ryan, Kathy Ziegler

Weekly Sunday Bulletin – 16th Sunday of Matthew

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The Holy and Righteous Symeon the God-Receiver and the Holy Prophetess Anna– Feb. 3

Yesterday we celebrated the Meeting of our Lord in the Temple; today we honor the righteous Elder Symeon and Prophetess Anna, who prophesied concerning Him by the inspiration of the Holy Spirit and were the first in Jerusalem to receive Him as the Messiah.

Parish Council on duty:
Peter Angelakos, John Argiropoulos, Anna Merkel, Medon Michaelides, Chris Nichols, Peter Synoyannis, Eleni Varvoutis

Icon Update

This is our latest update with those who have pledged and given for our new Iconography/Hall Renovation Project.

Balcony and Downstairs
Anonymous 2 Segments of Balcony
Chris Nichols Medallion
Jordan & Evangelia Elrod Medallion – St. Cyril
Carmen and Curtis Elrod Medallion – St. Methodios
Mary Sefferly Medallion – St. Ephrosyni
John A Faturos Medallion
Athena Loucas Medallion – St. John of the Ladder
Dimitra Karachalias Medallion
John Loupasakis Medallion – St. Kalliope
Stelios Groussis Family Medallion – St. Stylianos
Gregory and Suzanne Zorbas Medallion
Christina Ioannou Standing Saint – St. Christianos
Anonymous Standing Saint – St. Rafael
Amalia Papadimitriou and Christopher Siegle Standing Saint
Suzanne Spiliotis Standing Saint – St. Gerasimos
Anonymous Mural of Miracles – Raising Lazarus
Athanassios Zizzopoulos Mural of Miracles – Baptism Of Christ
Haralambos and Stavroula Bakalis Mural of Miracles – Elevation of the Holy Cross
Altar
Nick Scandalios Mural of Holy Communion in Altar
Dome
In Memory of Rev. Constantine Mitsos Resurrection of the Lord
Ioannou Family Transfiguration of the Lord
Mina Drimaropoulos Crucifiction of the Lord
Narthex
George Georgakakis Two Icon Stands
Harry Tangalakis Dome
Anonymous 2 Pangaria
Laskas Meyer Family 1 Mosaic Candle Offering Area
Ioannou Family 2 Sand Pits & Marble
Ioannou Family 1 Mosaic Candle Offering Area
Outside Mosaics
Harry Tangalakis Mosaic Angel in Front of Church – Facing Church on left
Dr Kay Hamperas Mosaic Angel in Front of Church – Facing Church on right
Glass Doors In Church
Anonymous 1 Door
Rail Around Balcony
Juanita Antley 2 Sections
Anonymous 1 Section
George and Judy Jimokas 6 Sections
Mary Owen and Sophia Thermis 1 Section
Peter & Kim Liakos 1 Section
Gordon & Susan Oliver 1 Section
Christina Ioannou 1 Section
Betty Monezis 2 Sections
Voicu Family 1 Section

The Family and the Church – The Cup of Joy

Fr. Christopher Metropulos
January 27, 2013

Book Reference
Can you Drink the Cup?
By Henri J. M. Nouwen

Opening thoughts and basis for discussion

Bring people, a joy and peace they are not able to find anywhere else.

We all need a deeper relationship with someone.

Cup of life, Cup of sorrow- joys, sadness and gladness, mourning and dancing are never separated.

Icon of the Resurrection explained

Show two depictions of Crucifixion

Scripture

When I lifted up from the earth, I shall draw all the people to myself (John 12:32)
Was it not necessary that the Christ should suffer before entering His glory? Luke 24:26

The Key

We keep forgetting this truth and become overwhelmed by our own darkness. We need to become angels for one another.

Drinking the Cup

When guests arrive to our house the first thing we usually do is ask , would you like something to drink? It breaks the ice and often an atmosphere of friendship and of intimacy is created. Refusing it is avoiding intimacy. Offering the drink leads to opening up a conversation. Often times we may not expect or ever be able to hear.
“Often when we wish to comfort people we say: “Well , it is sad this has happened to you, but try to make the best of it.” But “making the best of it” is not what drinking the cup is about. Drinking our cup is not simply adapting ourselves to a bad situation and trying to use is as well as we can. Drinking our cup is hopeful, courageous, and self-confident way of living. It is standing in the world with head erect, solidly rooted in the knowledge of who we are, facing the reality that surrounds us and responding to it from our hearts.”

Spiritual greatness does not come from flying with the angels but rather walking through life with someone who needs our comfort and love. Living in a Christian community allows this to take place.

Encounter with Mother Theresa in Denver, Co.

Question: How do we appropriate the love of God given to us?

Cup of Salvation

Friendship – What is good about our life is that you make so many friends. What is hard about our life is that so many friends leave.

Drinking the cup of sorrow and joy is only possible when it brings us health, strength, freedom, hope, courage- new life. Nobody will drink the cup of life when it makes us sick and miserable.

How do we drink the cup of salvation?
To the bottom

Living a complete life is drinking our cup until it is empty, trusting that God will fill it with everlasting life.

The Answer

The cup that Jesus speaks about is neither a symbol of victory nor a symbol of death. It is a symbol of life, filled with sorrows and joys that we can hold, lift, and drink as blessing and a way to salvation.

Weekly Sunday Bulletin – 15th Sunday of Luke

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The three most great luminaries of the Three-Sun Divinity have illumined all of the world with the rays of doctrines divine and true; they are the sweetly-flowing rivers of wisdom, who with godly knowledge have watered all creation in clear and mighty streams: The great and sacred Basil, and the Theologian, wise Gregory, together with the renowned John, the famed Chrysostom of golden speech. Let us all who love their divinely-wise words come together, honoring them with hymns; for ceaselessly they offer entreaty for us to the Trinity. Three Hierarchs—January 30.

Parish Council on Duty
Manny Daskos, George Georgakakis, Michael Haralambis, John Ioannou Jr., Delcho Ogorelkoff, Demetrios Rapanos, Kevin Ryan, Kathy Ziegler

 

Here is the study guide for this weeks adult class taught by Fr. Chris.

Weekly Sunday Bulletin – 12th Sunday of Luke

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The Ten Lepers

Apolytikion in the First Tone

The pastoral flute of your theology conquered the trumpets of orators. For it called upon the depths of the Spirit and you were enriched with the beauty of words. Intercede to Christ our God, O Father Gregory, that our souls may be saved.
(St. Gregory the Theologian  January 25th)

Parish Council on Duty:

Peter Angelakos, John Argiropoulos, Anna Merkel, Medon Michaelides, Chris Nichols, Peter Synoyannis, Eleni Varvoutis

Here is the study guide for this weeks adult class taught by Fr. John

The Family and the Church – The Cup of Community

Fr. John Codis
January 20, 2013

Book Reference
Can you Drink the Cup?
By Henri J. M. Nouwen

Opening thoughts and basis for discussion

We all have a cup that we must lift up that carries within itself our pains, sorrows, frustrations, happiness, and joy. Whether our glass is half full or half empty we all have a cup that we must live with and lift up.

When we lift our cup together we encourage and create community. “Community is a fellowship of people who do not hide their joys and sorrows but make them visible to all in a gesture of hope.” Pg.63 Community is a fellowship of little people who together make God visible in the world.

The Eucharist is the sacred mystery that creates all things new again. It transforms our whole life into one with Christ and one another.

Do not “Do it Yourself!” Do whatever you are planning to do with someone else.

Lifting Our Life Together with All

Life is full of ups and downs, joys and sorrows – but we do not need to live them alone. On the contrary we should be living them together! We want to lift our cups together and celebrate the truth that the wounds of our individual lives become sources of healing when we live them as part of a fellowship of love.

Lifting up the cup is an invitation to affirm and celebrate life together. We are not created to be separate from one another, we are individual parts of the one body of Christ.

1 Corinthians 12
“Just as a body, though one, has many parts, but all its many parts form one body, so it is with Christ. 13 For we were all baptized by one Spirit so as to form one body—whether Jews or Gentiles, slave or free—and we were all given the one Spirit to drink. 14 Even so the body is not made up of one part but of many.”

When we are fully able to embrace our own lives, we discover that what we claim we also to want to proclaim. We are too often inclined to keep out lives hidden. How can we be part of the one body of Christ if we do not completely embrace our lives and embrace the lives of those around us and together lift our cups which in essence forms the community, the one body of Christ.

The Cup of Blessings

We too often look around us to see and become fearful of the immense suffering of humanity. Why don’t we look around and see that this suffering has been created by the fall of humanity and completely turned around and saved by Christ on the cross.
Humanity has experienced the ultimate joy, that is the incarnation of the Word, God manifested in the flesh, born as none other than a baby. The nativity impacts us when we allow that joy of the birth of Christ to enter into ourselves and make it manifest in our daily lives.
The Eucharist is that sacred mystery through which what we lived as a curse we no live as a blessing.

Conclusion

Do not “Do it Yourself!” Do whatever you are planning to do with someone else.

We need community! A community in which confession and celebration are always together and constantly in our hearts. We must constantly remind ourselves that there is UNITY in community. We are all part of the one mosaic of the body. The body of which Christ is the head. We are the individual parts of the body that are held together by our willingness to lift our cups, with all their imperfections, so that one community may be formed as the image of Christ on earth.

Weekly Sunday Bulletin – After Holy Theophany

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Fr. Chris and Fr. John are now blessing homes. If would like them to come to your home, please call the church office, or fill out the “Bring Christ into your Home” form.
(Found in the south narthex)

Parish Council on Duty:
Manny Daskos, George Georgakakis, Michael Haralambis, John Ioannou Jr., Delcho Ogorelkoff, Demetrios Rapanos, Kevin Ryan, Kathy Ziegler

 

Here is the study guide for this weeks adult class taught by Fr. Chris.

The Family and the Church – Holy Communion

Fr. Christopher Metropulos
January 13, 2013

Book Reference
Can You Drink the Cup?
By Henri J. M. Nouwen

Opening thoughts and basis for discussion

“Can you drink the cup that I am going to drink”, the question posed by Jesus Christ to his friends James and John, the sons of Zebedee. We must ask ourselves the very same question. Can we taste all of the bitter and sweet of life and still march forward?

Drinking wine is more than just drinking. It involves knowledge about what kind and year wine you are drinking and your ability to share information with others about what exactly is special about this wine? Similarly just living life is not enough. We must know what we are living.  A life that is not reflected upon isn’t worth living.

Holding the Cup of Life

Poverty and wealth, success and failure, beauty and ugliness aren’t just facts of life. They are realities that are lived very differently by different people, depending on the way they are placed in the larger scheme of things.

Great courage is needed to take stock of our lives, review and then make changes for the better rather than accept the norm of what we are living for living sake.

Holding the cup of life is a hard discipline. We like to drink of life right away as we are a thirsty people but sometimes it is better to stop and examine what it is we are partaking of at that moment. Is what I am going to drink of good for me for my family? This question needs to be answered.

The Cup of Sorrow

We all experience sorry some to a greater to degree than others but we will all face some form of it in our lives. While no one wants to it is inevitable that it will happen. Usually we come out different people, stronger and more committed or we just give up and begin to flow in a different and not so good direction.

Priestly sorrow shared; parishioners struggles seen like no one else could see them. People who have to deal with others who have sorrow in their lives begin to refocus at least for a time on their own sorrow filled or dreams unfulfilled lives. These are the lives that no sermon, television show or quick fix will cure. Time doesn’t even cure them but faith in God can.

Holy Friday and Resurrection Sunday. There is always someone suffering more in the world than we are at any given moment.  Does this make our suffering any less; of course not but it does put it into perspective. Whose cup then is this…it is my, yours, the worlds to drink of?

Reflection of reading this verse as a seminary student and now as a priest of over 30 years… I can tell you it is very different due to my life experiences as a man, husband, father, grandfather and priest.

Can any of us drink the cup of Jesus? We usually answer yes but have no idea what we are saying. The cups of sorrow for ourselves but what about the entire world?  Cup full of physical, mental and spiritual anguish. It can be a cup of starvation, torture, loneliness, rejection, abandonment, and immense anguish. Just think of what He went through! How many of us could have done this?

Conclusion
Jesus as we know asked for the cup to pass so He would not have to suffer.  He said, “My soul is sorrowful to the point of death” (Matthew 26:38). His agony was so intense that “his sweat fell to the ground like great drops of blood (Luke 22:44). Nevertheless He pressed on. He possessed a trust beyond betrayal, surrender beyond despair, a love beyond all fears. He therefore is a model for us in our despair to not let the cup pass but to drink from it in full faith and knowledge of God’s love for us.